Anchor are said to be the potsherds of archaeology, but are they really? Anchors are an incredibly useful tool for dating shipwrecks—if not intrusive to a site—and they provide a wealth of information to archaeologists ranging from clues on a ship’s sinking, geophysical or metallurgical sciences, to seamanship in general. If you have ever wondered how to anchors developed throughout history, how to actually record archaeological or historic anchors, and how to properly refer to their parts, then enroll in this topic and get some hands on experience.

This topic is an intensive field practicum that will teach you about ancient to modern-day anchors and moorings.  You will learn how to archaeologically record and photograph anchors (and anchor parts), how to make technical and archaeological drawing of anchors (by hand and using AutoCAD), and make 3D models using Agisoft PhotoScan.

If you can’t tell a fluke from a stock, come let us teach you the difference. This topic includes practical sessions during which you will record and draw the historic anchors in and around Adelaide. SCUBA diving qualifications are not necessary for participation.

This topic is especially suited for those interested in material culture, historic ships and shipping and sailors but will be of benefit to all graduate students and industry professional.

The practicum will be based in Adelaide,  South Australia (both on and off the Flinders University main campus).

 

SCHEDULE (Monday 11 April to Friday 15 April)

Day 1

Introduction and orientation to lab and equipment 8:45-9:00

Lecture 1: History and Archaeology of the Ancient Anchor 9:00–10:00

Lecture 2: Understanding anchor shapes and terminology 10:00–10:30

Lecture 3: Anchors in the last 400 years: A guide to anchors & Moorings 10:45–11:45

Seminar 1/Project 1: Photography & 3D modelling: Agisoft Photoscan 12:30–17:00

Project 1: Processing data I: Creating a 3D model of an anchor using Agisoft Photoscan

 

Day 2

Lecture 4: Recording anchors 9:00–9:30

Seminar 2 (practical): Recording historic or archaeological anchors around Adelaide 10:00–15:00

Project 2: Processing data II: Make a port-folio for your anchor: Research its type and possible date, label your photographs, and enter your recording sheets, location data and photographs into the Big Anchor Database. 15:00–17:00.

 

Day 3

Seminar 3/Project3: Archaeological illustration: draw from your recording sheets one of the recorded anchors (pencil & ink). Your final project should include a data recording sheet and one 1:10 scale archaeological drawing with at least two views. 9:00–17:00

 

Day 4

Seminar 4/Project4: Learning how to use AutoCAD for technical and archaeological illustration 9:00–17:00

 

Day 5

Project 4 cont.: How to make a technical drawing of an anchor using AutoCAD. Your final project should include a 1:1 scale technical drawing of an anchor with at least two views. 9:00–16:30

Project 1, cont.: Processing data I: Creating a 3D model of an anchor using Agisoft Photoscan 9:00–16:30

Wrap-up and Evaluations: 16:30–17:00

 

Day 6 (only for Flinders students who graduate on Day 2) (Monday 18 April)

Seminar 2 (practical): Recording historic or archaeological anchors around Adelaide 10:00–15:00

Project 2: Processing data II: Make a port-folio for your anchor: Research its type and possible date, label your photographs, and enter your recording sheets, location data and photographs into the Big Anchor Database. 15:00–17:00.

 

This topic aims to:

Provide graduate students with the opportunity for additional training in practical aspects of maritime archaeology and the opportunity to apply their theoretical classroom learning to “real world” situations.

  • Introduce students to professional maritime archaeologists and the breadth and depth of their job descriptions. This should help students develop a sense of workplace culture, and understand the utility of developing reasoning and research skills for future use in the workplace.
  • Expose students to the range and variety of field projects, methodologies and practical skills necessary for conducting maritime archaeology and give further meaning and relevance to their classroom learning experiences.

Students should:

  • Become “workplace literate” acquiring the practical and technical skills for conducting maritime archaeology fieldwork. They should also gain a better understanding for the legal and ethical responsibilities that accompany the profession.
  • Create professional relationships with maritime archaeologists currently working in the field and gain an understanding of their workplace and job descriptions. Students will also enhance their employment prospects by acquiring field experience.
  • Develop an appreciation for working in a team setting, acquiring the personal and professional attributes necessary to work with others to complete tasks.