2017

Specialist Library Skills for Independent Research – Friday 24 March

By Tim Ormsby, Flinders University Central Library

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

If you think you already know everything about the library, this master class will show you how much more you have to learn.  Delivered by the Humanities Liaison Librarian, Tim Ormsby, this master class is designed specifically to assist graduate students who are undertaking independent research for Directed Studies, research methods, Masters or PhD theses, or any other research-based assignments.  It will show you how to use electronic and library resources more effectively, introduce you to some sources that you may not know about, and is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in their research.

Location: Central Library, Computer Lab 1
Date: Friday 24 March
Time: 11am-1pm
Cost: There is no cost
Contact person: Mick Morrison

 

Swamp Day: A Muddy Visit to the Garden Island Ships’ Graveyard and SA Maritime Museum – 17 March 2017

by Wendy van Duivenvoorde, Department of Archaeology

Swamp day is back! Swamp Day is a 1-day master’s class aimed at familiarizing students with ship graveyards and the cultural heritage management of these unique areas. Of the approximately 800 shipwrecks in South Australia over 70 are classed as graveyard vessels which were abandoned deliberately in areas along the coastline (www.shipsgraveyards.sa.gov.au). This master’s class will include a muddy tour through Garden Island Ships’ Graveyard near Port Adelaide. Be prepared to get very muddy! This course will be run by Adjunct Professor Mark Staniforth.

Location: Garden Island, Port Adelaide. Meet at the Archaeology Lab (HUM114) 9:00 am (minibus).
Date: 17 March, 2017
Time: 9:00am-4pm
Costs: $15.00pp; You will need to bring your own lunch, water, towel, a pair of sturdy water booties and a change of clothes. You may want to wear a wet suit as you could be in mud up to your waist. Wetsuits can be checked out from the Technical Officer 48  hours in advance.  Click here to pay.


Equipment: wetsuit (long johns), wetsuit booties with thick soles (lots of sharp rusty metal), long sleeve shirt broad brim hat, water, sunscreen, insect repellent (mosquitos are BIG), large plastic bag (to put all your muddy gear in).
Contact Person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

Schedule:

9.30am - Leave Flinders Uni
11.00am - Arrive at Garden Island Ships Graveyard
1.30pm - Lunch in Port Adelaide
2.00pm - Visit to SA Maritime Museum
3.00pm - Leave Port Adelaide
4.00pm - Arrive at Flinders Uni

 

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session - Friday 3 March 2017

By John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Any undergraduate, colleague or graduate student who wishes to access the Archaeology Laboratories in Humanities building, especially rm. 113 (such as to gain experience in laboratory sorting as a volunteer, to access the collections or use the computers) will be expected to have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session. This information is a pre-requisite to access and lab use.  This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University, laboratory policy, procedures and regulations.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 113 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Date: Friday 3 March 2017
Time:  11am-Noon
Costs: There is no cost
Equipment: Must wear closed shoes and bring a pen
Contact person: John Naumann

 

2016

DCIEM  Decompression Tables - Friday 14 October 2016
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

This class will focus on using these required piece of dive kit; a reliable paper based, Australian Standard deco tables.
They have quirks, twists, turns and math.
You will need to record you dives and logbooks with them, and plan your assignment with them.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Teaching Lab)
Date:
Friday 14 October 2016
Time: 09:30 – 11:30
Equipment: Pad, pen, ruler and calculator
Contact Person: John Naumann

 

FINAL Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session – 15 September 2016
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology
This is the final WHS induction offered for 2016.

A masterclass for Graduate Students who have prospective projects requiring use of the new laboratory facilities.

Graduate students who wish to use the new facilities in the Archaeology Laboratories will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session. This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations. Students who completed the WHS induction for the old labs (SSS) are required to undertake a WHS induction for the new labs (HUMNS) before commencing research.
Please note that no food, drink or coffee is permitted in the lab

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 113 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Date:  Thursday 15 September
Time:  1:30-2:45pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Wear enclosed shoes & bring a pad, pen and your ID card.
Contact person: John Naumann

 

Archives 101 (and where to find stuff!) – 2 September 2016
by Bas De Groot, Manager – Flinders University Records
Undergraduate students welcome

The talk will deal with the following issues:

  • What are archives (and what are they not)?
  • The role of archives in society.
  • How are archives organised (archival principals)?
  • So what’s in it for me?

Students will be able to talk directly with an archivist to glean inside knowledge and understand what are the Flinders University Archives
During the talk Bas will also make use of the websites of a few Archives and Trove.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Teaching Lab)
Date:  Friday 2nd September 2016
Time:  10am-12pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Mick Morrison

 

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session – 17 August 2016
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

A masterclass for Graduate Students who have prospective projects requiring use of the new laboratory facilities.

Graduate students who wish to use the new facilities in the Archaeology Laboratories will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session. This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations. Students who completed the WHS induction for the old labs (SSS) are required to undertake a WHS induction for the new labs (HUMNS) before commencing research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 113 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Date:  Wednesday 17 August
Time:  1:30-3:30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

Knots and Splices – 19 August 2016 - (back by popular demand!)
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO A MAXIMUM OF 10 STUDENTS.   

While knots, splices, and ropes were the everyday fare for maritime persons in days gone by, “city-slickers” need to be taught how to tie good, useful knots and they need to practice this skill.  This is not just a maritime skill either – every time you take a trailer out for terrestrial fieldwork you need to tie it down properly and safely, so knowing how to tie a good knot is an essential skill for all successful archaeological fieldwork.  

This wide ranging master class with Technical Officer and knot-wizard, John Naumann, will look at types of rope, how to care for rope, how to coil it and, of course, how to tie it.  John will cover a range of useful knots and splices for marine/maritime and terrestrial fieldwork.  Some of the knots covered will include the reef knot, sheet bend and double, double figure eight, bowline, eye splice and whipping.  The class will also practise the ever useful “truckies’ knot” (also known as the Waggoner’s hitch)—which is the ‘must have’ knot for any would-be serious archaeologist—rope work, throwing and pullies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 19 August
Time:  9.30am-1.00pm
Cost:  There is no cost
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

 

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session – 5 August 2016
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

A masterclass for Graduate Students who have prospective projects requiring use of the new laboratory facilities.

Graduate students who wish to use the new facilities in the Archaeology Laboratories will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session. This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations. Students who completed the WHS induction for the old labs (SSS) are required to undertake a WHS induction for the new labs (HUMNS) before commencing research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Date:  Friday 5 August
Time:  9:30-11:30 am
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

Ways of Thinking About Publishing - 27 May 2016
Gillian Dooley and Liz Hall, Central Library, Flinders University

In this workshop we will look at the why, what, where and how of publishing. We’ll help you think about a publishing strategy, about the various types of material you can publish, about the best journals, magazines, websites, publishers and so on to target for different types of material, and about the mechanics of academic and non-academic publishing.

The class is oriented towards students currently working on a thesis (at all levels), recent graduates, early career researchers or others with an interest in publishing.

Date: Friday 27 May 2016
Time: 10:00-12:00
Location: Humanities 112 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Cost: There is no cost
Contact: Mick Morrison

Torrens Island Quarantine Station Master Class - 6 May 2016
by Britt Burton, South Australian Maritime Museum

The Quarantine Station was built in 1879 to stop passengers bringing diseases such as small pox into Adelaide. Today, the site is remarkably intact and evokes the experiences of passengers placed in quarantine from the 1880 to the 1950s. Most of the buildings on the site date from 1912 to 1916 but parts of the original nineteenth century station remain. Our tour will lead you through the site with plenty of time to peer in windows, photograph the buildings and explore the site. We will lead you through the process that passengers undertook as they arrived at the jetty, their luggage was fumigated, they bathed in diluted carbolic acid and were either taken to the bungalows or the isolation hospital. You will see the bathing blocks that separated first and second class passengers, the boiler house used to power fumigation, the morgue and isolation hospital. The character of the buildings, the history of the site and the ambience of the natural environment make Torrens a very evocative place.

We will reach Torrens Island by van and walk through the Quarantine Station. Visitors need to be able to walk over grass fields and gravel paths. Closed toe shoes are compulsory. Mosquito repellant is also a good idea!
All students are welcome to register, though there is a limit of 11 students for this master class.

Date: Friday 6 May
Time: 10:00-14:00
Location: Meet at Humanities 114 for 9:00 departure
Cost: $15 pp (i.e. transport, tour, and entry into the Museum and Lighthouse) Click here to pay
Contact: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

 

An Introduction to Zotero - 18 March 2016
by Dr Mick Morrison, Department of Archaeology

This masters class will introduce participants to the bibliographic management software Zotero (http://zotero.org), which is a flexible and relatively user-friendly alternative to using Endnote and other similar tools. It enables users to manage large databases of digital sources including media files, books, journals, reports, newspaper articles and many other common materials that we use in archaeology. It also allows for the management of PDFs and notes, automatic extraction of PDF annotations, the sharing of sources among research groups, automated import of sources and a range of report generation options. The class assumes no previous knowledge of the software.

The class will be held in the Digital Computer lab. All students are welcome to register, though there is a limit of 10 seats in the class. If the class fills up, then priority will be given to students currently working on their thesis.

Date:
Friday 18th March
Time:
13:00-15:00
Location:
Humanities 114 (Digital ResearchLab)
Contact:
Mick Morrison

 

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session – 11 March 2016
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

A masterclass for Graduate Students who have prospective projects requiring use of the new laboratory facilities.

Graduate students who wish to use the new facilities in the Archaeology Laboratories will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session. This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations. Students who completed the WHS induction for the old labs (SSS) are required to undertake a WHS induction for the new labs (HUMNS) before commencing research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Date:  Friday 11 March
Time:  9:30-11 am
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

2015

Knots and Splices – 30 October 2015 - (back by popular demand!)
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO A MAXIMUM OF 10 STUDENTS.   

While knots, splices, and ropes were the everyday fare for maritime persons in days gone by, “city-slickers” need to be taught how to tie good, useful knots and they need to practice this skill.  This is not just a maritime skill either – every time you take a trailer out for terrestrial fieldwork you need to tie it down properly and safely, so knowing how to tie a good knot is an essential skill for all successful archaeological fieldwork.  

This wide ranging master class with Technical Officer and knot-wizard, John Naumann, will look at types of rope, how to care for rope, how to coil it and, of course, how to tie it.  John will cover a range of useful knots and splices for marine/maritime and terrestrial fieldwork.  Some of the knots covered will include the reef knot, sheet bend and double, double figure eight, bowline, eye splice and whipping.  The class will also practise the ever useful “truckies’ knot” (also known as the Waggoner’s hitch)—which is the ‘must have’ knot for any would-be serious archaeologist—rope work, throwing and pullies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 30 October
Time:  9.30am-1.00pm
Cost:  There is no cost
Contact person:  John Naumann

 

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session – 23 October 2015
by John Naumann, Department of Archaeology

A masterclass for Graduate Students who have prospective projects requiring use of the new laboratory facilities.

Graduate students who wish to use the new facilities in the Archaeology Laboratories will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session. This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations. Students who completed the WHS induction for the old labs (SSS) are required to undertake a WHS induction for the new labs (HUMNS) before commencing research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 113 (Archaeology Research Lab)
Date:  Friday 23 Oct 2015
Time:  9am-11am
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

 

Colonial Firepower: A primer on Firearms-related Artefacts for Australian Archaeologists - 16 October 2015
A masterclass by Dr Nicolas Grguric


Firearms played a significant role in the colonization and defence of Australia in the 19th century and firearms-related artefacts frequently occur on Australian archaeological sites. However, these artefacts are often misunderstood, and the chronological and interpretative data that they can provide is often under-utilised. This Master Class will present a chronology of firearms use and development in 19th century Australia, as well as provide a practical guide for archaeologists for the identification, description, and interpretation of firearms-related artefacts.

Location:
Humanities Room 112
Date:
Friday 16 October
Time:
10:00am-12noon
Cost:
There is no cost
Contact person:
Mick Morrison

An Introduction to Agisoft Photoscan: 3D Photogrammetry for Archaeology - 9 October 2015
by Jonathan Benjamin, Department of Archaeology


This half-day workshop will introduce students to the basic principles of photogrammetry for archaeological site and material recording. Students will be introduced to the software package Agisoft Photoscan and will be able to practice acquiring and processing a photogrammetric model. Techniques for image recording and file preparation will also be discussed.

Note: It is expected that the new computer lab will be functional and software will be provided for the seminar, however students can also download a free trial of photoscan, and are encouraged to do so prior to the Master Class.

Please bring a digital camera and card reader or a cable to plug into the computers to enable you to transfer data.

Location: Meet at HUMS112
Date: Friday 9 October 2015
Time:
10:00am-4:00pm with a lunch break
Cost:
There is no cost
Contact person:
Jonathan Benjamin

 

Photography workflow management with Adobe Lightroom - 21 August 2015

This two hour workshop will take students through the basic principles of using Adobe Lightroom to manage an archaeological photography workflow. Students will learn how to import, organise and file their photographs in a way that is conducive to archaeological recording. Students will also be introduced to some basic photo editing and other tips related to archaeological photography: this will include consideration for terrestrial, aerial and underwater photography and will also introduce students to the concept of managing archaeological datasets for photogrammetric 3D recording (note: if you are interested in the Photoscan/photogrammetry Master Class in October, it is strongly suggested you attend this session). Students should bring with them a laptop and should download Adobe Lightroom (a free trial is available online).

Location:
Humanities Room 112
Date: Friday 21 August 2015
Time: 
1:30 - 3:30
Costs:
TBA
Contact person:
Jonathan Benjamin

 

Cultural Issues for Archaeologists Working with Aboriginal Communities – 14 August 2015
A Master Class by Tauto Sansbury

UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This cross-cultural awareness session will consider various critical cultural issues that archaeologists should be aware of when working with Aboriginal communities. Topics covered will include:Cultural competency;

  • Understanding Aboriginal experiences of colonialism;
  • Understanding racism and stereotypes;
  • Aboriginal perspectives of archaeology and experiences of working with archaeologists and other heritage professionals; and
  • Skills to maintain good community relationships.

Tauto Sansbury is a highly respected South Australian Aboriginal leader. He is a proud South Australian Aboriginal man, born on Point Pearce Mission (Burgiyana) on the Yorke Peninsula of Narungga heritage, with family links on the West Coast of South Australia. Tauto has more than 30 years experience advocating and working for Aboriginal people in all areas of Aboriginal disadvantage. He was deeply involved in the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, working with Elliott Johnston, QC, and led both the National and South Australian Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committees (AJACs) for more than 10 years, both monitoring the implementation of the recommendations and ensuring that lasting change took place regarding Aboriginal incarceration at all levels.
 
Tauto was also consultant to the Social Inclusion Unit undertaking community consultations on the so-called ‘Gang of 49’ for the Breaking the Cycle Report. More recently he has been employed as CEO and General Manager in health and Aboriginal employment. He is widely recognised for his considerable knowledge and expertise in working for change for Aboriginal people and was awarded an Australian Centenary Medal in 2003 by the Commonwealth “In recognition of work as Director of the Aboriginal Justice Advocacy Committee and the National Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee.” He was also awarded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year, both National and South Australian NAIDOC awards in 1996, Male Elder of the Year SA NAIDOC awards 2014 and the 2015 National NAIDOC Lifetime Achievement Award in July this year. For more information about Tauto see http://www.garridja.com/


Location: 
Flinders Campus, Social Sciences North 223
Date: 
14 August 2015
Time: 
10:00am – 1:00pm
Costs: 
There is no cost.
Contact person:
Amy Roberts

 

Treasure ships: Art in the Age of Spices - 31 July 2015
This master class is held at the Art Gallery of SA and entails a special tour by James Bennett, Curator of Asian Art.

Please note that this class is restricted to 11 students and the cost, which is the entrance fee, is to be paid on arrival at the Art Gallery.

Art in the Age of Spices is the first exhibition in Australia to present the complex artistic and cultural interactions between Europe and Asia from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries—a period known as the Age of Spices.  This exhibition includes 300 outstanding and rarely-seen works of ceramics, decorative arts, furniture, metalware, paintings, prints and textiles from public and private collections in Australia, India, Portugal, Singapore and the United States. The works of art selected reveal how the international trade in spices and other exotic commodities inspired dialogue between Asian and European artists, a centuries old conversation whose heritage is the aesthetic globalism we know today.
 
A highlight of the exhibition will be a diverse range of Christian artwork created at ports such as Goa and Nagasaki on loan from Portugal and India as well as the inclusion of two works from the personal collection of Queen Adelaide (1792–1849) after whom the city of Adelaide is named. Another highlight are some artefacts retrieved from VOC ship Batavia, which sank off the Western Australian coast in the seventeenth century.
 
So, enrol! Especially, our maritime archaeology students! For more information 
 
Location: Depart from Humanities Car Park 5
Date: Friday, 31 July 2015
Time: 9:00am - return to campus 2pm
Costs: $15 entrance fee
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

 

Knots and Splices – 29 May 2015
John Naumann, Department of Archaeology.

THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO A MAXIMUM OF 10 STUDENTS.   UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

While knots, splices, and ropes were the everyday fare for maritime persons in days gone by, “city-slickers” need to be taught how to tie good, useful knots and they need to practice this skill.  This is not just a maritime skill either – every time you take a trailer out for terrestrial fieldwork you need to tie it down properly and safely, so knowing how to tie a good knot is an essential skill for all successful archaeological fieldwork.  

This wide ranging master class with Technical Officer and knot-wizard, John Naumann, will look at types of rope, how to care for rope, how to coil it and, of course, how to tie it.  John will cover a range of useful knots and splices for marine/maritime and terrestrial fieldwork.  Some of the knots covered will include the reef knot, sheet bend and double, double figure eight, bowline, eye splice and whipping.  The class will also practise the ever useful “truckies’ knot” (also known as the Waggoner’s hitch)—which is the ‘must have’ knot for any would-be serious archaeologist—rope work, throwing and pullies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 29 May 2015
Time:  9.30am-1.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

 

Qualitative Research Methods for Archaeology and Heritage Mangement - 15 May 2015
Dr Darlene McNaughton, Discipline of Public Health, Flinders University

In this Masters Class, Dr McNaughton will provide an introduction to qualitative research by responding to the following questions: “What is Qualitative Research”; "What constitutes rigorous, trustworthy qualitative research”; and “ Why is it important  in Archaeology”.  Dr Darlene McNaughton is a social anthropologists who has undertaken long term ethnography fieldwork in Aotearoa, northern and southern India and western Cape York peninsula.  She teaches “PHCA9502 Qualitative Research methods” at Flinders university and has worked in cultural heritage for more than a decade

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: 15 May 2015
Time: 10.00am-12noon
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Mick Morrison
 

White Card Training - 8 May 2015

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND. 
SPACES ARE LIMITED

The White Card course is a Nationally Recognised Training Course designed to provide the participants with a common understanding of Occupational, Health, Safety & Welfare principles and practices used on generic building, construction and civil sites. This course is a mandatory requirement for persons working on construction sites in Australia. This is a useful qualification for archaeology graduates seeking employment in the cultural heritage management sector.

On successful completion of the course students will be issued with a Statement of Attainment for the unit of competency CPCCOHS1001A Work Safely in the Construction Industry and their photo ID White Card.

Please note: this class requires registration and payment 1 week prior to the class commencing. Participants should also register with the Australian Government Department of Education and Training Unique Student Identifier ahead of this course, and provide your USI number when you register. See: http://www.usi.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 8 May 2015
Time: 9.00am-3.00pm
Costs: $100 Payment must be made by 30 April. Click here to make payment No refunds will be possible since the training provider is also unable to provide refunds unless cancellation is made 5 week days prior to the course.
Contact person: Mick Morrison

Specialist Library Skills for Independent Research – 1 May 2015
Aliese Millington - Humanities Liaison Librarian

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

If you think you already know everything about the library, this master class will show you how much more you have to learn.  Delivered by the Humanities Liaison Librarian, Aliese Millington, this master class is designed specifically to assist graduate students who are undertaking independent research for Directed Studies, research methods, Masters or PhD theses, or any other research-based assignments.  It will show you how to use electronic and library resources more effectively, introduce you to some sources that you may not know about, and is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in their research.

Location:
Lab 2, Central Library
Date:
1 May 2015
Time:
10.00am-1.00pm
Costs:
There is no cost.
Contact person:
Mick Morrison

 

Potential and limits of ancient DNA in biomolecular archaeology —10 April 2015
Dr Bastien Llamas, ARC Senior Research Associate, Australian Centre for  Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

After three decades of tumultuous existence, research in ancient DNA has morphed into the field of paleogenomics, reaching an unprecedented capacity to sequence complete genomes from a large number of long-dead organisms. By tracking changes in genetic diversity in real time, ancient DNA provides unique insights regarding recent evolutionary events, in particular regarding the hominin lineage. However, extracting and sequencing ancient DNA remains technically and economically challenging. This short lecture will give an overview of ancient DNA research with special focus on human evolution. I will briefly introduce the biochemical properties of ancient DNA and methods used in the laboratory, before highlighting the achievements, potential and limits of ancient DNA research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 10 April 2015
Time: 10.00am-12.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Mick Morrison

Fish Otoliths in Archaeology—27 March 2015
Morgan Disspain, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Otoliths are small structures found in the inner ear of teleost fish that act as organs of equilibrium and as direction and sound detectors. They possess unique characteristics that set them apart from other skeletal structures, and archaeological samples can provide invaluable information about past people, fish populations and environments. While otolith analyses are widely employed in modern fisheries studies, they have slowly been increasing within archaeological and palaeoenvironmental research. This master class will look at archaeological otoliths, what they are, how they are analysed, and what they can tell us. The main methods of analysis will be examined, and practical exercises will be included.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 27 March 2015
Time:
10.00am-12.00pm
Costs:
There is no cost.
Contact person:
Mick Morrison

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session - 20 March 2015

UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.
 
Any undergraduate or graduate student who wishes to access the Archaeology Laboratories in Social Science South (such as to gain experience in laboratory sorting as a volunteer, to access the collections or use the computers) will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session.  This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 20 March 2015
Time: 
10am-Noon
Costs:
There is no cost.
Equipment:
Nil
Contact person: 
John Naumann

A Geospatial Primer for Archaeologists — 13 March 2015
Robert Keane, School of the Environment, Flinders University

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Geospatial technologies (or geomatics) have emerged as major part of archaeological practice internationally and knowledge of at least some key methods are often a prerequisite for firms seeking to employ graduates. However, getting one’s head around these technologies is not for the feint of heart. This Masters Class aims to provide participants with a robust introduction to the geographic information system—a critical tool for management of digital archaeological data. In addition, it will provide participants with a ‘cooks tour’ of some other major geospatial technologies including remote sensing, 3-D scanning, LIDAR and photogrammetry. It assumes minimal knowledge of such technologies, and is intended to help participants to begin to develop proficiency in some of these areas.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 13 March 2015
Time: 10.00am-12.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Mick Morrison

Field Trips and Risk Assessments – 6 March 2015

University related trips beyond the campus (excluding conferences) require specific, signed, authorisation from the Dean of the School of Humanities and Creative Arts.  This includes trips for the purposes of reconnoitre, site familiarisation, research, photography, oral histories, excavations, site plan drawing and artefact collection - all of which require specific paper work. As a new researcher, finding your way through the first daunting pile of paperwork can be convoluted, and slow.  The Faculty OHS&W Officer Central WHS Consultant & Archaeological Technical Officer John Naumann will outline what is involved in the process. He will explain the forms, and help you understand the kind of thinking required in order to help make your research ideas, realistic and well documented in terms of risk assessments. He will work through common scenarios, and answer any specific questions about your own field trips.
 
This master class is designed specifically to help students who may be planning field trips for their Masters research or as part of topics such as Heritage Management Planning (ARCH8019) or Directed Studies (ARCH8403 and 8404) or for their thesis.  It will help you to understand the paperwork required and to fill it out so that your field work can be approved quickly and efficiently.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 6 March 2015
Time: 9.30am-12.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann