2014

How Old Is It? – Friday 1 August
A Master Class with Dr Alan Watchman
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

How do archaeologists determine the source of a stone artefact?  This class will focus on describing and explaining the mineralogical and geochemical techniques used in provenance studies.  What are the benefits and limitations of the methods?  The class will also examine sampling strategies, within and between source variability, basic geological aspects and analytical errors.  Some knowledge of the scientific methods including XRD, Infrared spectroscopy, pXRF, XRF, PIXE/PIGME, Neutron activation, laser ablation ICPMS, LIBS etc would be advantageous, but not essential.

This class is designed to give students a better understanding of the science behind provenance studies that are useful for stone tools and applicable to glass, ceramics and metals.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 1 August 2014
Time: 10am-12pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  Mick Morrison

Researching and Recording Anchors  6 June
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Anchors are said to be the potsherds of archaeology, but are they really? Anchors are an incredibly useful tool for dating shipwrecks—if not intrusive to a site—and they provide a wealth of information to archaeologists, ranging from clues on a ship’s sinking, geophysical or metallurgical sciences, to seamanship in general. If you have ever wondered how anchors developed throughout history, how to record archaeological or historic anchors, and how properly to refer to their parts, then come to this master class and get some hands on experience.

Location: HUMN112
Date: Friday 6 June 2014
Time: 10am–4pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Pack a lunch and wear clothes suitable for traveling around town
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

 

 Oral History Interviewing for Archaeologists – 23 May
A Master Class by professional historian, Dr Susan Marsden
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Susan Marsden is the former president of the Professional Historians Association of South Australia (http://www.sahistorians.org.au/) and current president of the History Council of South Australia, as well as being a highly-experienced history and heritage consultant on national, state and local projects, including writing short and long commissioned histories, carrying out heritage studies, curating exhibitions and oral history interviews. She has been responsible for recording more than 200 oral history interviews, including as an ongoing interviewer of the National Library of Australia, the State Library of South Australia and the City of Onkaparinga.
This Master Class will provide the historian’s perspective on the value of oral history, and will introduce participants to the difference between oral history (what historians do) and casual oral interviewing (which tends to be what archaeologists do). It will cover the some of the practices and methods of oral history as a particular way of accessing the past, including guidelines for interviewing, ethical issues to be aware of and the importance of archiving interview materials.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 23 May 2014
Time: 10.00 – 12.00 pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Digital Engagement for Heritage Specialists  16 May
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This master class will provide an introduction to using modern digital technology to connect people with heritage and culture. This class is ideal for students wanting to learn how to use social media in a professional manner, in order to effectively engage with and inspire the public. It is also suitable for existing heritage professionals wanting to use social media in a structured way to create measureable impact. Learn how to professionally manage an online presence for an organisation, embed digital engagement into projects, and use your own social media presence to boost your career. This master class aims to teach how to use digital media in a more effective way thereby making you more valuable to current or future employers.

Outline of the master class:
•    Introduction to web 2.0 – where are we now?
•    Social media channels – which is the right tool for the job?
•    A closer look at mobile technology – using smartphones in smarter ways
•    Digital engagement strategies – plan what you want to achieve and how you will get there
•    Metrics – understanding what success looks like.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 16th May
Time:
10am – 1pm
Costs:
There is no cost
Equipment:
Bring your smartphone or tablet if you have one.
Contact person:
Amy Dale

The Victorian Aboriginal Heritage System: Is it the Future for South Australia? – 9 May
A Master Class by Oona Nicholson, Director, Ecology and Heritage Partners Pty Ltd
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

In this master class Oona will explain how the Victorian Aboriginal heritage system works, including Cultural Heritage Management Plans, Due Diligence reports, and Registered Aboriginal Parties. What does the heritage manager or developer need to know? Aspects of the Victorian legislation have been suggested as a model for proposed changes to the South Australian Aboriginal Heritage Act 1988, which is currently under review, as well as other state acts around Australia. The advantages and disadvantages of each legislation are explored to give you a perspective on the state of play of Aboriginal heritage legislation in Australia. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a Q & A at the end of the session.

Whether you’re a student, a consultant, in industry or in government, this master class is a must for anyone who wants to understand how legislation translates into action and how the specifics of Aboriginal heritage legislation around Australia is changing.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 9 May 2014
Time: 10.00 – 1.00 pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

 

City of Adelaide behind the Scenes Tour – 3 May
Excursion to the City of Adelaide clipper ship in Port Adelaide and guided tour by Peter Christopher around and possibly inside the ship. Max. 12 students. Maritime archaeology students have preference.
Location: Depart from Humanities Car Park 5
Date: Saturday 3 may 2014
Time: 8:00am - return to campus 1pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde


Specialist Library Skills for Independent Research – 2 May

UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

If you think you already know everything about the library, this master class will show you how much more you have to learn.  Delivered by the Humanities Liaison Librarian, Aliese Millington, this master class is designed specifically to assist graduate students who are undertaking independent research for Directed Studies, research methods, Masters or PhD theses, or any other research-based assignments.  It will show you how to use electronic and library resources more effectively, introduce you to some sources that you may not know about, and is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in their research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Central Library, Computer Lab 2
Date: Friday 2 May 2014
Time: 10am-12noon
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Aliese Millington

 

The Federated Archaeological Information Management System (FAIMS): What It Is and How To Use It – 11 April
A Master Class by Dr Shawn Ross and Dr Adela Sobotkova, UNSW

FAIMS (https://www.fedarch.org/wordpress/) is a comprehensive information system that has been designed specifically by archaeologists for archaeologists. It allows you to collect digital data in the field and the laboratory using mobile Android devices (phones and tablets), process it in local databases, extract it to a data warehouse suitable for sophisticated analysis, and then exchange it online through cultural heritage registries and data repositories. The FAIMS system will be a must for anyone working in the field – it will save you time, prevent double handling of data (paper to electronic) and allow you to analyse your data spatially via a web app (Heurist).

The first Master Class will introduce you to the FAIMS mobile application, while the second will build on this to provide more in depth tuition in how to design modules for recording tailored to your own projects.

PART 1: Basic User Workshop: The FAIMS mobile application
The FAIMS mobile application is a tool for recording archaeological (and in fact any other kind of research) data in the field. It will work on any Android 4.0+ device and has the following key features:
•    Customisable recording modules to create and edit data directly on the device (data schemas and user inferfaces are created using XML definition files).
•    Full versioning (the ability to review and, if necessary, reverse all changes made to a dataset).
•    Lightweight mapping for drawing archaeological features (vectors), tracking survey paths and displaying geo-referenced raster files.
•    Synchronisation and backup across multiple mobile devices and a local server (which can run on a moderately priced laptop).
•    Everything works offline and disconnected, including the GIS!

The basic user workshop will teach students how to download the FAIMS app, how to connect to the proper server to download the right modules for your fieldwork, how to work using the app, how to synchronize data, and more.

PART 2: Intermediate User Workshop: FAIMS mobile application design

This higher level workshop includes training in mobile application design, module creation via the FAIMS server, deployment to devices, data collection and editing on your device or the server, and module editing on the server. It is more intensive and hands-on.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 11 April 2014
Time: 9.00am-5.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil – BUT IF YOU HAVE AN ANDROID DEVICE (TABLET OR PHONE) PLEASE BRING IT ALONG.  THIS IS THE ONLY EQUIPMENT YOU WILL NEED BUT THE NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTAL DEVICES ARE LIMITED.
Contact person: Heather Burke


Field Trips and Risk Assessments – 4 April

University related trips beyond the campus (excluding conferences) require specific, signed, authorisation from the Faculty Executive Dean.  This includes trips for the purposes of reconnoitre, site familiarisation, research, photography, oral histories, excavations, site plan drawing and artefact collection - all of which require specific paper work. As a new researcher, finding your way through the first daunting pile of paperwork can be convoluted, and slow.  The Faculty OHS&W Officer & Archaeological Technical Officer John Naumann will outline what is involved in the process. He will explain the forms, and help you understand the kind of thinking required in order to help make your research ideas, realistic and well documented in terms of risk assessments. He will work through common scenarios, and answer any specific questions about your own field trips.

This master class is designed specifically to help students who may be planning field trips for their Masters research or as part of topics such as Heritage Management Planning (ARCH8019) or Directed Studies (ARCH8403 and 8404) or for their thesis.  It will help you to understand the paperwork required and to fill it out so that your field work can be approved quickly and efficiently.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 4 April 2014
Time: 9.30am-12.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

Yorke Peninsula Saltwater Classic - 5 April

The Yorke Peninsula’s Saltwater Classic is a special event designed to tap into growing national and international appreciation and enjoyment of vessels of a bygone era. These vessels have been faithfully restored by their owners, and they showcase the skills and styles of boat builders from last century. The Australian Maritime Museum defines a classic boat as any vessel with unique and enduring qualities.  This free event attracts people from across Australia to parade their boats in the waters off the sister towns of Stansbury and Port Vincent, and it draws spectators to a variety of water-based and shore-based events. The ever popular Stansbury Seaside Market is held on the Sunday of the Regatta weekend so forms part of the activities. You can also browse stalls along the beachfront where the boats come in to the beach. On the Saturday there will be a mini-market in the Port Vincent Town Hall.  Bring your lunch!     http://www.ypsaltwaterclassic.org.au/

Location: Depart from Humanities Car Park 5
Date:
Saturday 5 April 2014
Time: 8:00am - return to campus 5-6pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Bring your lunch
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

The Origins of Modern Australians – 28 March 2014
A Master Class with Fulbright Senior Scholar, Dr Arthur Durband
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

The study of modern human origins in Australia has a long history. Throughout much of this history, workers interested in the origins of the Australians have often focused on scenarios that invoke multiple founding populations for the modern inhabitants of this continent. For example, “The mark of ancient Java” has long been thought to link populations like the Ngandong fossils to both fossil and modern Australian Aboriginals. More recently, genetic evidence has suggested that the Denisovans contributed genes to modern Australian populations, suggesting that at least some admixture did take place in Southeast Asia and Australasia. This class will summarize our current understanding of modern human origins in Australasia and examine a series of hypotheses that could reconcile the potentially conflicting evidence from the fossils and ancient DNA.

This class is designed to give students an overview of the current state of our understanding of the fossil and genetic evidence for modern human origins in Australia. The evidence presented here will be relevant to many research problems dealing with the initial peopling of Australia.

Arthur Durband is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Texas Tech University and a Visiting Research Fellow at the South Australian Museum. He is currently an Australian-American Fulbright Senior Scholar. His research focuses on modern human origins and the peopling of Australia.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 28 March 2014
Time: 9.30am-11.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

How Old Is It? – 21 March 2014
A Master Class with Dr Alan Watchman
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

How do archaeologists determine the age of artefacts and rock art?  This class will focus on dating techniques, including carbon-14, luminescence and uranium-series.  What is the science behind the methods and what can go wrong?  Infamous case studies for dating sediments at archaeological sites, artefacts, petroglyphs and pictographs will be discussed to expose what needs to be done, and what not, to obtain reliable age determinations.  Some knowledge of these dating methods would be advantageous, but it is not essential.

This class is designed to give students a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of these techniques, and how to decide which method is appropriate.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 21 March 2014
Time: 10am-12pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Cultural Issues for Archaeologists Working with Aboriginal Communities – 14 March 2014
A Master Class by Kim McCaul and Major Sumner
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This cross-cultural awareness session will consider various critical cultural issues that archaeologists should be aware of when working with Aboriginal communities. Topics covered will include cross-cultural competency, Aboriginal perspectives of archaeology and the maintenance of good community relationships.  Kim McCaul has worked as an anthropologist at the Native Title Section of the South Australian Crown Solicitor's Office, where he had extensive opportunity to work with contemporary Australian Aboriginal societies, and now works as a professional consultant.  Major Sumner is a prominent Ngarrindjeri elder, who is involved in all aspects of Indigenous affairs in South Australia.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  14 March 2014
Time:  10:00am – 12:30pm
Costs:  There is no cost.
Contact person: Amy Roberts


Archaeology Laboratory OHS Induction Session – 14 March 2014
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Any undergraduate or graduate student who wishes to access the Archaeology Laboratories in Social Science South (such as to gain experience in laboratory sorting as a volunteer, to access the collections or use the computers) will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory OHS Induction Session.  This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 14 March 2014
Time:  1.30pm-3.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

Designing Professional Posters for Conferences and Community Groups – 7 March 2014
A Master Class by consultant archaeologist and editor of Australian Archaeology, Dr Lynley Wallis
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Thinking of presenting a poster at NASC, AIMA, ASHA or AAA this year? If so, then this Master Class is for you! Designed to teach you the basic skills required for creating professional looking posters for conference presentations and community groups, this Master Class will give you a general overview of poster dos and don’ts and some of the basics about software available.  Students will have the opportunity to put the theory into practice with a hands-on computer based session as part of this session.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: 7 March 2014
Time: 10.00am-1.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Heather Burke

2013

Archaeological Site Plans ­ 8 November
A Master Class with Guadalupe Cincunegui, consultant archaeologist.
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Technology continues radically to change the face of field archaeology and there are those who argue that photographs are quicker and more useful, but it cannot be denied that site plans and sections remain one of the most important records for archaeological recording. At their most basic, archaeological plans represent a visual horizontal record of deposits, features and architecture revealed during the course of excavation, while at their most complex, they also offer an interpretation of the site, its associated features and permit phasing of architecture.

In this workshop, you will learn about different types of archaeological site plans, common conventions, different drawing and measuring techniques and tricks that can help you plan the most difficult of objects.

The workshop will be two-three hours long and will focus on:

•    Planning tools and setup tips: What are some of the common things you'll find in every planner¹s toolbox prior to setting foot on a site?
•    Setting up a site grid and using it to anchor site plans.
•    Drawing conventions: Need to draw a skeleton? Do you draw it at 1:10 or 1:20? How to show inclines, undercutting, straight edges, drip lines, bedrock, rock cut features, walls, postholes and a large variety of other common archaeological features.
•    Drawing: Practical components, including setting up a 3,4,5, planning with a frame, planning with offsets, planning with triangulation and other useful techniques that will show you how to plan under different circumstances.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 8 November 2013
Time: 10.00am-1.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Amy Roberts

Cultural Heritage and the Law ­ 1 November
A Master Class with Andrew Collett
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Andrew Collett is a highly respected Adelaide lawyer with extensive experience in the areas of Aboriginal heritage, native title, administrative, personal injuries and industrial law. In his early career he worked as a solicitor and barrister for the Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement and was retained as junior counsel to act for all Aboriginal interests before the Royal Commission into British Nuclear Tests in Australia. He was subsequently retained as counsel by the traditional owners of the Maralinga Lands.  Andrew has been retained as counsel for Aboriginal people and organisations in the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, the Hindmarsh Island Bridge Royal Commission, Children in State Care Inquiry, various native title claims and in the first South Australian “stolen children” action.  In 2007 Andrew was also the Assistant Commissioner in the Children on APY Lands Inquiry.  During his career Andrew has held a number of significant roles including Chairperson of the South Australian campaign against racial exploitation and as a member of the Law Society of South Australia’s human rights and Aboriginal issues committees.

In this Master Class Andrew will be sharing his expertise about:
•    How to locate heritage and related legislation;
•    How to read and understand various pieces of heritage legislation from around the country and how they differ;
•    How to understand how other legislation interacts with heritage legislation (e.g. environmental and native title legislation);
•    Particular case studies that demonstrate the importance of working within relevant heritage legislation; and
•    How heritage professionals may interact with the courts in their careers and issues relating to being an expert witness.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 1 November 2013
Time: 10.00am-12.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Amy Roberts


Still and Video Photography for Underwater Archaeology - 25 and 26 October

A Master Class with Helen Carter, Screen and Media Studies

UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This 2-part class introduces students to the essential elements of video and still camera operation on land and in the water. Friday will consist of lectures, practical hands-on training in camera operation and maintenance and review of student work. Lectures will commence at 10am in Room N331 at Sturt Campus. Students can catch a shuttle bus to Sturt Campus from outside the Registry Building.
 
In order to take these skills underwater, students need to become familiar with camera operation while on SCUBA.  Students will be given the opportunity to refine their underwater camera and buoyancy skills in a half-day pool class on Saturday 26th.
 
You must have a current dive medical and be registered as a university diver to attend the Saturday half-day pool session as a snorkeler or diver.  Please send all relevant dive-related information to the Maritime Technical Officer, John Naumann (John.Naumann@flinders.edu.au).
 
All snorkelers/divers should have their own mask, fins, weight belt and snorkel (Flinders will supply weights and other gear as needed).  If you need gear, let the Technical Officer know by e-mail well in advance.

Friday 25/10/13
Bring your dive qualification card with you.
Bring your own dive gear. [you should have already booked gear with me if needed.]
MEET; 08:30 in the Arch Labs SSS 143
Pack vehicle.
Travel to Adelaide Scuba (Glenelg) to set up by 09:30
IN Water; 10:00 – 13:00
EXIT water 12:50, rinse gear
Pack up and return to Uni, hang out and dry gear.

 
Location: Sturt Campus. Room N331.
Dates: Friday 25th October 2013, 10am-5pm, optional second session Saturday 26th October, 2013
Costs: None.
Equipment: For those participating in the underwater session, you will need proof of current dive certification, diving paperwork and all diving equipment.
Contact: John Naumann

 

Liscad and You, PART 2 - 18 October (continued from 11 October)
A Master Class with Rob Koch (continued)

Location:  Flinders Campus
Date:  11 October 2013 and 18 October 2013
Time:  9.30am-4.30pm.
Costs:  Nil.
Contact person:  Heather Burke

Liscad and You, PART 1 – 11 October (continued on the 18th October)
A Master Class with Rob Koch.

This master class follows on from the first semester Total Station courses but is open to anyone wishing to learn the basics.

Liscad is a surveying package designed in Australia that supports all major Total Stations and other electronic survey equipment. It is used to reduce observed field data and generate 2D plans and 3D models.  This Master Class will teach you the basics of how to produce plans from Total Station data.

Topics covered will include:-
•    Configuration of the job space, e.g. UTM or Lat/Long coordinates
•    Entity tables
•    Downloading data from a Total Station.
•    Editing & computations
•    Terrain Modeling and contouring
•    Importation of images.
•    3D visualization.
•    Output to Liscad Cad, Autocad, ESRI or other packages
•    Output to Total Stations for point layout in the field.
•    How to get your own licensed copy of Liscad.

Rob, a Licensed Surveyor, has worked as the consultant surveyor on many archaeological projects over the past 10 years or so.

Location:  Flinders Campus
Date:  11 October 2013 and 18 October 2013
Time:  9.30am-4.30pm.
Costs:  Nil.
Contact person:  Heather Burke 


Introduction to the Total Station – 20 September
Back (again) by popular demand!
A Master Class with professional surveyor, Rob Koch
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 8 STUDENTS. 

This Master Class will be a basic ‘how to’ session on setting up and using a total station to survey a site and record spatial data in the field.  It will cover:
i) Data Dictionary - what are we picking up and what are we calling it?
ii) The Total Station and its components.
iii) The elements required for to know where you are.
iv) Setting up and recording data.
v) Down loading and reduction of observations.
vi) Fixing the stuff ups (should not be necessary!).

Rob Koch is an adjunct member of the Flinders Archaeology Department and a professional surveyor who also taught surveying for many years at TAFE.  He has worked extensively with archaeologists around Australia.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 20 September 2013
Time: 10.00pm-4.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  Heather Burke


Your Career Part 2: Addressing Selection Criteria and Succeeding at a Job Interview – 13 September

A Master Class presented by Mark Gregory, Flinders Careers and Employer Liaison Centre (CELC)
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This Master Class follows on from the CVs and Career Building Master Class offered in first semester. Dealing in detail with the vital need to address selection criteria effectively in your written job application and the actual process of interview itself (either in person or by phone), this Master Class will give you an understanding of how to successfully market your skills and strengths in the job market.

Presented by Mark Gregory of the Flinders Careers and Employer Liaison Centre (CELC), feedback from Graduate Employers has been considered when designing this session. Mark has extensive experience sitting on selection panels, in tertiary, government and commercial contexts. This masterclass is a must for all graduates intending to seek employment in the field after completing their studies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  13 September 2013
Time:  9.30am-2.30pm.
Costs:  Nil.
Contact person:  Kerry Ludwig
 

Side Scan Sonar – 6 September
The side scan sonar master class will introduce you to the basics of using an important piece of equipment in the search for underwater archaeological sites. You will gain experience in the basics and fundamentals of setting up and running a survey, learn the parts of the unit and be able to put it together, as well as learn how to deploy the fish and collect the data. Basic information will be provided on processing the data, including familiarity with software, identifying targets and mosaicing data.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  6 September 2013
Time:  9.00am-5.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Equipment: Pack a lunch and wear clothes suitable for traveling on an open boat.
Contact person: John Naumann


Dutch Tall Ships in Adelaide – 31 August*

*Yes, a Saturday – these ships are only in Adelaide for the weekend, so don’t miss out! 
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

As part of their trip between South Africa and Sydney three replica Dutch Tall Ships will be visiting Adelaide on the weekend of the 31st August-1st September.  We will take a mini-bus from campus for anyone wishing to see them.  See http://www.dutchtallships.com/ for details on the ships and their voyage so far.

Location: Port Adelaide - The mini-bus will leave Flinders University (Meet at Car Park 5 - Adjacent to the Humanities building). 
Date:  31 August 2013
Time:  9:30am to 4:30 approx. Open ships event starts at 11:00am.
Costs:  $10 - cost of the bus. PAYMENT must be made to Kerry Ludwig (or Chantal Wight) in the Humanities PPPS office (Hum 215). Bring your student ID and payment receipt with you on the day. 
Other Details: Each of the ships websites ask for a gold-coin donation = 3 x $2. There may be an entry fee of $8 for the Maritime Museum.  If you need to buy your lunch etc then extra cash will be needed. A hat, sunscreen and wind breaker type jacket and some  nibbles are also highly recommended.
Note: There is no formal syllabus nor assessment. It is simply a chance to go over the ships when they are in Port Adelaide.
Contact person: John Naumann

Editing for Archaeological Publishing - 30 August
This master class will give you practical experience at achieving the standards needed for archaeological publishing.  After a short lecture, we will be work-shopping sections of the corrected proofs of Claire Smith (ed.) Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology, due for publication in September, 2013. 
The URL for this is: http://refworks.springer.com/mrw/index.php?id=2499

The workshop will start at 10am and finish at 5pm.  Students who stay for the day will have the opportunity to obtain a free book from Springer.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  30 August 2013
Time:  10.00am-5.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Designing Professional Posters for Conferences and Community Groups – 23 August
A Master Class by consultant archaeologist and editor of Australian Archaeology, Lynley Wallis

This master class is designed to teach you the basic skills required for creating professional looking posters for conference presentations and community groups. Following a general overview of poster dos and don’ts and some of the basics about software available, students will have the opportunity to put the theory into practice with a hands-on computer based session.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  23 August 2013
Time:  10.00am-1.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Serving as an Expert Witness: What Every Archaeologist and Heritage Consultant Needs to Know – 2 August
A Master Class with Dr Neale Draper, Managing Director, Australian Cultural Heritage Management.
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Archaeologists may be called upon to serve as expert witnesses in court cases at both State and Federal levels. Drawing on Neale’s extensive experience, this master class will provide an overview of the role and responsibilities of archaeologists as expert witnesses and how evidence can be presented to the court effectively.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  2 August 2013
Time:  2pm-5pm
Costs:  Nil.
Contact person:  Heather Burke


Knots and Splices – 9 August

THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO A MAXIMUM OF 10 STUDENTS
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

While knots, splices, and ropes were the everyday fare for maritime persons in days gone by, “city-slickers” need to be taught how to tie good, useful knots and they need to practice this skill.  This is not just a maritime skill either – every time you take a trailer out for terrestrial fieldwork you need to tie it down properly and safely, so knowing how to tie a good knot is an essential skill for all successful archaeological fieldwork. 

This wide ranging master class with Technical Officer and knot-wizard, John Naumann, will look at types of rope, how to care for rope, how to coil it and, of course, how to tie it.  John will cover a range of useful knots and splices for marine/maritime and terrestrial fieldwork.  Some of the knots covered will include the reef knot, sheet bend and double, double figure eight, bowline, eye splice and whipping.  The class will also practise the ever useful “truckies’ knot” (also known as the Waggoner’s hitch)—which is the ‘must have’ knot for any would-be serious archaeologist—rope work, throwing and pullies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  9 August 2013
Time:  9.30am-1.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann
 
Understanding and Using a Sextant – 9 August
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO A MAXIMUM OF 8 STUDENTS
A Master Class presented by the Company of Master Mariners.

UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

In this exciting Master Class, members of the Company of Master Mariners will provide students with an introduction to the Company, and to the basics of maritime navigation. The session will be particularly focused on how a sextant functions, its evolution and development and how to use one in a hands-on practical session.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  9 August 2013
Time:  2.00-4.30pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

Introduction to Artefact Illustration – 14 June
A Master Class with professional archaeological illustrator, James Hunter.

THIS CLASS IS LIMITED TO THOSE STUDENTS WHO HAVE NOT PREVIOUSLY COMPLETED AN ARTEFACT ILLUSTRATION MASTER CLASS.  THIS CLASS IS ALSO LIMITED TO 15 STUDENTS.

UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

Artefact Illustration is a 1-day master class aimed at familiarizing students with aspects of drawing artefacts for publication. Artefact illustration is a skill all students can learn, regardless of their artistic talents. Students will learn how to make line drawings and stippled drawings. This class will be taught by professional artefact illustrator, James Hunter III.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 14 June 2013
Time: 9:00am - 5:00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  James Hunter 

Atoms and Archaeology – 7 June
A Master Class with AINSE Fellow, Rachel Popelka-Filcoff
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

Many areas of the physical sciences have more and more relevance to archaeological research.  While some techniques such as carbon-14 dating have been used for decades in archaeological studies, new techniques have emerged with applications in compositional analysis, analyzing ancient technologies, provenance studies and more.  This class will focus on the techniques and case studies for analytical methods such as neutron activation analysis (NAA), particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) and IR spectroscopy.  Some hands-on experiments may be used.  An extensive scientific expertise is not necessary for this class. This class is designed to give students a better big-picture understanding of the advantages and limitations of these technologies, and how to apply them appropriately to archaeological questions.  The material presented will be relevant to many research areas dealing with the chemical and physical analysis of artefacts and sites.

Rachel Popelka-Filcoff is a Lecturer and AINSE Fellow in the School of Chemical and Physical Sciences at Flinders.  Her research focuses on the applications of analytical and radioanalytical chemistry and development of new analytical methods to cultural heritage materials.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 7 June 2013
Time: 10:00am - 12:00noon
Costs: Nil
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  Heather Burke


Introduction to the Total Station – 7 June

Repeat class – if you didn’t make it into the first class, try this one!
A Master Class with professional surveyor, Rob Koch
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 8 STUDENTS. 

This Master Class will be a basic ‘how to’ session on setting up and using a total station to survey a site and record spatial data in the field.  It will cover:
i) Data Dictionary - what are we picking up and what are we calling it?
ii) The Total Station and its components.
iii) The elements required for to know where you are.
iv) Setting up and recording data.
v) Down loading and reduction of observations.
vi) Fixing the stuff ups (should not be necessary!).

Rob Koch is an adjunct member of the Flinders Archaeology Department and a professional surveyor who also taught surveying for many years at TAFE.  He has worked extensively with archaeologists around Australia.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 7 June 2013
Time: 12:00noon - 5:00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  Heather Burke

 

OMG Do I Actually Have to Use One of These? All You Need to Know About Hand-held GPS for Use in the Consulting Industry – 31 May
A Master Class with consultant archaeologist, Lynley Wallis

You've probably been taught something about handheld GPS units in one topic or another during your degree. You’ve probably had a chance to use one for a few hours during a field methods class or field school; hell, you might even own one of your own!  You might be thinking, ‘What more do I really need to know?’ But even if you own one, it probably gathers dust in a drawer, forgotten for most of the year excepting the one or two occasions you have reason to use it, and then all you do is record waypoints and not much else.  But when you graduate and head off to your first consulting job, all of a sudden that little black, grey or yellow GPS becomes the single most important piece of fieldkit you will ever use – it wouldn’t be exaggerating to say that often, working in remote areas, your life literally will depend on it. In this master class we’ll look at exactly how consulting archaeologists use Garmin GPS units – the different types of data (points, tracks and polygons), how to upload data, how to record data, how to download data, and how to process data for consulting purposes.  The software that will be explored is Garmin Basecamp, which is freeware available for anyone to download and that allows you to do everything you need to simply and quickly without an all-singing-and-dancing GIS system. All students will have a GPS unit to work with (if you have one of your own bring it along), and the session will be primarily hands-on, involving data from actual consulting projects, enabling participants to develop a much greater level of confidence in how to use GPS effectively will help to make you work-ready for paid employment.
 
Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 31 May 2013
Time: 9:30am - 12:30pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  Heather Burke

 

Introduction to the Total Station – 24 May

A Master Class with professional surveyor, Rob Koch
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 8 STUDENTS. 

This Master Class will be a basic ‘how to’ session on setting up and using a total station to survey a site and record spatial data in the field.  It will cover:
i) Data Dictionary - what are we picking up and what are we calling it?
ii) The Total Station and its components.
iii) The elements required for to know where you are.
iv) Setting up and recording data.
v) Down loading and reduction of observations.
vi) Fixing the stuff ups (should not be necessary!).

Rob Koch is an adjunct member of the Flinders Archaeology Department and a professional surveyor who also taught surveying for many years at TAFE.  He has worked extensively with archaeologists around Australia.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 24 May 2013
Time: 10:00pm - 4:00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:
  Heather Burke 

Introduction to Zotero  - 17 May

Zotero is a free research tool that can help you to organise your research sources, create reference lists, keep track of research notes, and develop collaborative web-based research databases with relatively little effort.  This workshop provides an introduction to using bibliographic databases for archaeologists as well as a hands-on walkthrough of setting up and using Zotero to do all of these things. No prior knowledge of bibliographic databases or Zotero is necessary.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 130 (Computer Lab)
Date:  Friday 17 May 2013
Time:  9:00am - 11:00am
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  Mick Morrison


An Introduction to Conflict Resolution - 17 May
A Masterclass with consultant archaeologist, Jo Thredgold

Working as a professional archaeologist requires a wide skill set, and negotiating between often conflicting stakeholders or participants over a range of issues is part and parcel of the job.  How do you deal with conflict? Would you like some new perspectives and strategies?  This Master Class will be presented by Jo Thredgold, a professional consultant archaeologist who also has a Masters in Conflict Management from UniSA, and has worked at the Offenders Aid and Rehabilitation Services of South Australia (OARS SA) and at the Centre for Restorative Justice at OARS.  This Master Class will be a discussion-based class covering a range of aspects of conflict, including how conflicts start, different types of conflict, the role of shame in conflict, and formal and informal management strategies—all within the context of archaeology and CHM. By the end of the class participants should have some new strategies to identify how a conflict might have originated and some new options for responding to it.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 17 May 2013
Time:  12:00noon - 3:00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  Heather Burke

Senior First Aid - 10 May

Senior First Aid is a 1-day Master Class aimed at training students in the most recent program in First Aid.  First Aid is a very useful certificate for archaeologists working in the field because you never know when you might need it.  This class will be organised by Technical Officer Chantal Wight and taught by a professional First Aid instructor from St John Ambulance Australia, with an online component to be completed BEFORE the class begins.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Function Centre (below the Media and Communications Office)
Date:  Friday 10 May 2013
Time:  9:00am - 5:00pm
Costs:  $130
Contact person:  Chantal Wight

CVs and Career Building - 3 May
A Master Class with Mark Gregory, Flinders Careers and Employer Liaison Centre (CELC)
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

One of the most important factors in getting an interview for a job in the archaeology and heritage management fields is having the right CV and an application that effectively addresses the stated selection criteria.  This master class will help you to produce professional, accurate and relevant CVs tailored to the contemporary workplace and give you an opportunity to learn about what makes an effective CV.  By the end of the master class each student will have produced a draft version of their own CV suitable for seeking employment in archaeology and heritage management.  In this interactive session you will also develop an understanding of response frameworks, including the STAR model and take on a 'Selector's Perspective' to analyse written responses.

Presented by Mark Gregory of the Flinders Careers and Employer Liaison Centre (CELC), feedback from Graduate Employers has been considered when designing this session. 

The presenters have extensive experience sitting on selection panels, in tertiary, government and commercial contexts. This masterclass is a must for all graduates intending to seek employment in the field after completing their studies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 3 May 2013
Time:  10:00am - 12:00noon
Costs:  Nil.
Contact person:  Kerry Ludwig

Archaeological Photographic Techniques - 12 April 
A Masterclass with professional photographer, James Bateman
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

This Master Class will introduce you to the basics of archaeological photography, particularly artefact photography and the basic dos and don’ts of fieldwork photography.  James Bateman is a professional photographer and qualified archaeologist, with extensive experience of field photography in a variety of conditions.  

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 12 April 2013
Time:  10:00am – 1:00pm
Costs:  Nil.
Contact person: Heather Burke

 

Using Mind Maps to Enhance Your Research Productivity – 5 April
A Master Class presented by Hugh Kearns, Professional Development Unit, Flinders, and Thinkwell.
 
Mapping your ideas is a creative way to organise your thinking. There are a range of tools that can help you do this, such as concept maps, mind maps or idea maps. These techniques are used all over the world by students, teachers, researchers and in business as a way of improving learning and increasing creativity. They can be used to: organise the content and ideas in your thesis, structure a paper or report you need to write, prepare your lecture or presentation, or record brainstorming sessions. They are effective, easy to use and most of all FUN. In this workshop you will learn by doing. You will see how an idea map is created and then create your own using your own topic. This Master Class will be useful for students currently undertaking theses or major projects, and especially for students enrolled in ARCH8020 (Research Methods), since a mind map is one of your assessable pieces of work.  It will include an opportunity for you to use idea mapping on your own research project, so bring along your ideas!
 
Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 5 April 2013
Time: 9.30 - 11.30am
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Field Trips and Risk Assessments – 22 March
University related trips beyond the campus (excluding conferences) require specific, signed, authorisation from the Faculty Executive Dean.  This includes trips for the purposes of reconnoitre, site familiarisation, research, photography, oral histories, excavations, site plan drawing and artefact collection - all of which require specific paper work. As a new researcher, finding your way through the first daunting pile of paperwork can be convoluted, and slow.  The Faculty OHS&W Officer & Archaeological Technical Officer John Naumann will outline what is involved in the process. He will explain the forms, and help you understand the kind of thinking required in order to help make your research ideas, realistic and well documented in terms of risk assessments. He will work through common scenarios, and answer any specific questions about your own field trips.

This master class is designed specifically to help students who may be planning field trips for their Masters research or as part of topics such as Heritage Management Planning (ARCH8019) or Directed Studies (ARCH8403 and 8404).  It will help you to understand the paperwork required and to fill it out so that your field work can be approved quickly and efficiently.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 22 March 2013
Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

Archaeology Laboratory OHS Induction Session – 15 March
Any graduate student who wishes to access the Archaeology Laboratories in Social Science South (such as to gain experience in laboratory sorting as a volunteer, to access the collections or use the computers) will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory OHS Induction Session.  This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations. 

Location: Flinders Campus, Social Science South143
Date:  Friday 15 March 2013
Time:  10:00am - 12:00noon
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

 

Specialist Library Skills for Independent Research – 8 March
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

If you think you already know everything about the library, this master class will show you how much you have to learn.  Delivered by the Humanities Liaison Librarian, Aliese Millington, this master class is designed specifically to assist graduate students who are undertaking independent research for Directed Studies, research methods, Masters or PhD theses, or other research-based assignments.  It will show you how to use electronic and library resources more effectively, introduce you to some sources that you may not know about, and is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in their research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Central Library, Computer Lab 2
Date: Friday 8 March 2013
Time: 9:00am - 11:00am
Costs: There is