2015

Photography workflow management with Adobe Lightroom - 21 August 2015

This two hour workshop will take students through the basic principles of using Adobe Lightroom to manage an archaeological photography workflow. Students will learn how to import, organise and file their photographs in a way that is conducive to archaeological recording. Students will also be introduced to some basic photo editing and other tips related to archaeological photography: this will include consideration for terrestrial, aerial and underwater photography and will also introduce students to the concept of managing archaeological datasets for photogrammetric 3D recording (note: if you are interested in the Photoscan/photogrammetry Master Class in October, it is strongly suggested you attend this session). Students should bring with them a laptop and should download Adobe Lightroom (a free trial is available online).

Location:
Humanities Room 112
Date: Friday 21 August 2015
Time: 
1:30 - 3:30
Costs:
TBA
Contact person:
Jonathan Benjamin

 

Cultural Issues for Archaeologists Working with Aboriginal Communities – 14 August 2015
A Master Class by Tauto Sansbury

UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This cross-cultural awareness session will consider various critical cultural issues that archaeologists should be aware of when working with Aboriginal communities. Topics covered will include:Cultural competency;

  • Understanding Aboriginal experiences of colonialism;
  • Understanding racism and stereotypes;
  • Aboriginal perspectives of archaeology and experiences of working with archaeologists and other heritage professionals; and
  • Skills to maintain good community relationships.

Tauto Sansbury is a highly respected South Australian Aboriginal leader. He is a proud South Australian Aboriginal man, born on Point Pearce Mission (Burgiyana) on the Yorke Peninsula of Narungga heritage, with family links on the West Coast of South Australia. Tauto has more than 30 years experience advocating and working for Aboriginal people in all areas of Aboriginal disadvantage. He was deeply involved in the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, working with Elliott Johnston, QC, and led both the National and South Australian Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committees (AJACs) for more than 10 years, both monitoring the implementation of the recommendations and ensuring that lasting change took place regarding Aboriginal incarceration at all levels.
 
Tauto was also consultant to the Social Inclusion Unit undertaking community consultations on the so-called ‘Gang of 49’ for the Breaking the Cycle Report. More recently he has been employed as CEO and General Manager in health and Aboriginal employment. He is widely recognised for his considerable knowledge and expertise in working for change for Aboriginal people and was awarded an Australian Centenary Medal in 2003 by the Commonwealth “In recognition of work as Director of the Aboriginal Justice Advocacy Committee and the National Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee.” He was also awarded Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Person of the Year, both National and South Australian NAIDOC awards in 1996, Male Elder of the Year SA NAIDOC awards 2014 and the 2015 National NAIDOC Lifetime Achievement Award in July this year. For more information about Tauto see http://www.garridja.com/


Location: 
Flinders Campus, Social Sciences North 223
Date: 
14 August 2015
Time: 
10:00am – 1:00pm
Costs: 
There is no cost.
Contact person:
Amy Roberts

 

Treasure ships: Art in the Age of Spices - 31 July 2015
This master class is held at the Art Gallery of SA and entails a special tour by James Bennett, Curator of Asian Art.

Please note that this class is restricted to 11 students and the cost, which is the entrance fee, is to be paid on arrival at the Art Gallery.

Art in the Age of Spices is the first exhibition in Australia to present the complex artistic and cultural interactions between Europe and Asia from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries—a period known as the Age of Spices.  This exhibition includes 300 outstanding and rarely-seen works of ceramics, decorative arts, furniture, metalware, paintings, prints and textiles from public and private collections in Australia, India, Portugal, Singapore and the United States. The works of art selected reveal how the international trade in spices and other exotic commodities inspired dialogue between Asian and European artists, a centuries old conversation whose heritage is the aesthetic globalism we know today.
 
A highlight of the exhibition will be a diverse range of Christian artwork created at ports such as Goa and Nagasaki on loan from Portugal and India as well as the inclusion of two works from the personal collection of Queen Adelaide (1792–1849) after whom the city of Adelaide is named. Another highlight are some artefacts retrieved from VOC ship Batavia, which sank off the Western Australian coast in the seventeenth century.
 
So, enrol! Especially, our maritime archaeology students! For more information 
 
Location: Depart from Humanities Car Park 5
Date: Friday, 31 July 2015
Time: 9:00am - return to campus 2pm
Costs: $15 entrance fee
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

 

Knots and Splices – 29 May 2015
John Naumann, Department of Archaeology.

THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO A MAXIMUM OF 10 STUDENTS.   UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

While knots, splices, and ropes were the everyday fare for maritime persons in days gone by, “city-slickers” need to be taught how to tie good, useful knots and they need to practice this skill.  This is not just a maritime skill either – every time you take a trailer out for terrestrial fieldwork you need to tie it down properly and safely, so knowing how to tie a good knot is an essential skill for all successful archaeological fieldwork.  

This wide ranging master class with Technical Officer and knot-wizard, John Naumann, will look at types of rope, how to care for rope, how to coil it and, of course, how to tie it.  John will cover a range of useful knots and splices for marine/maritime and terrestrial fieldwork.  Some of the knots covered will include the reef knot, sheet bend and double, double figure eight, bowline, eye splice and whipping.  The class will also practise the ever useful “truckies’ knot” (also known as the Waggoner’s hitch)—which is the ‘must have’ knot for any would-be serious archaeologist—rope work, throwing and pullies.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 29 May 2015
Time:  9.30am-1.00pm
Costs:  Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

 

Qualitative Research Methods for Archaeology and Heritage Mangement - 15 May 2015
Dr Darlene McNaughton, Discipline of Public Health, Flinders University

In this Masters Class, Dr McNaughton will provide an introduction to qualitative research by responding to the following questions: “What is Qualitative Research”; "What constitutes rigorous, trustworthy qualitative research”; and “ Why is it important  in Archaeology”.  Dr Darlene McNaughton is a social anthropologists who has undertaken long term ethnography fieldwork in Aotearoa, northern and southern India and western Cape York peninsula.  She teaches “PHCA9502 Qualitative Research methods” at Flinders university and has worked in cultural heritage for more than a decade

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: 15 May 2015
Time: 10.00am-12noon
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Mick Morrison
 

White Card Training - 8 May 2015

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND. 
SPACES ARE LIMITED

The White Card course is a Nationally Recognised Training Course designed to provide the participants with a common understanding of Occupational, Health, Safety & Welfare principles and practices used on generic building, construction and civil sites. This course is a mandatory requirement for persons working on construction sites in Australia. This is a useful qualification for archaeology graduates seeking employment in the cultural heritage management sector.

On successful completion of the course students will be issued with a Statement of Attainment for the unit of competency CPCCOHS1001A Work Safely in the Construction Industry and their photo ID White Card.

Please note: this class requires registration and payment 1 week prior to the class commencing. Participants should also register with the Australian Government Department of Education and Training Unique Student Identifier ahead of this course, and provide your USI number when you register. See: http://www.usi.gov.au/Pages/default.aspx

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 8 May 2015
Time: 9.00am-3.00pm
Costs: $100 Payment must be made by 30 April. Click here to make payment No refunds will be possible since the training provider is also unable to provide refunds unless cancellation is made 5 week days prior to the course.
Contact person: Mick Morrison

Specialist Library Skills for Independent Research – 1 May 2015
Aliese Millington - Humanities Liaison Librarian

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

If you think you already know everything about the library, this master class will show you how much more you have to learn.  Delivered by the Humanities Liaison Librarian, Aliese Millington, this master class is designed specifically to assist graduate students who are undertaking independent research for Directed Studies, research methods, Masters or PhD theses, or any other research-based assignments.  It will show you how to use electronic and library resources more effectively, introduce you to some sources that you may not know about, and is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in their research.

Location:
Lab 2, Central Library
Date:
1 May 2015
Time:
10.00am-1.00pm
Costs:
There is no cost.
Contact person:
Mick Morrison

 

Potential and limits of ancient DNA in biomolecular archaeology —10 April 2015
Dr Bastien Llamas, ARC Senior Research Associate, Australian Centre for  Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

After three decades of tumultuous existence, research in ancient DNA has morphed into the field of paleogenomics, reaching an unprecedented capacity to sequence complete genomes from a large number of long-dead organisms. By tracking changes in genetic diversity in real time, ancient DNA provides unique insights regarding recent evolutionary events, in particular regarding the hominin lineage. However, extracting and sequencing ancient DNA remains technically and economically challenging. This short lecture will give an overview of ancient DNA research with special focus on human evolution. I will briefly introduce the biochemical properties of ancient DNA and methods used in the laboratory, before highlighting the achievements, potential and limits of ancient DNA research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 10 April 2015
Time: 10.00am-12.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Mick Morrison

Fish Otoliths in Archaeology—27 March 2015
Morgan Disspain, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Adelaide

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Otoliths are small structures found in the inner ear of teleost fish that act as organs of equilibrium and as direction and sound detectors. They possess unique characteristics that set them apart from other skeletal structures, and archaeological samples can provide invaluable information about past people, fish populations and environments. While otolith analyses are widely employed in modern fisheries studies, they have slowly been increasing within archaeological and palaeoenvironmental research. This master class will look at archaeological otoliths, what they are, how they are analysed, and what they can tell us. The main methods of analysis will be examined, and practical exercises will be included.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 27 March 2015
Time:
10.00am-12.00pm
Costs:
There is no cost.
Contact person:
Mick Morrison

Archaeology Laboratory WHS Induction Session - 20 March 2015

UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.
 
Any undergraduate or graduate student who wishes to access the Archaeology Laboratories in Social Science South (such as to gain experience in laboratory sorting as a volunteer, to access the collections or use the computers) will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory WHS Induction Session.  This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 20 March 2015
Time: 
10am-Noon
Costs:
There is no cost.
Equipment:
Nil
Contact person: 
John Naumann

A Geospatial Primer for Archaeologists — 13 March 2015
Robert Keane, School of the Environment, Flinders University

GRADUATE STUDENTS AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Geospatial technologies (or geomatics) have emerged as major part of archaeological practice internationally and knowledge of at least some key methods are often a prerequisite for firms seeking to employ graduates. However, getting one’s head around these technologies is not for the feint of heart. This Masters Class aims to provide participants with a robust introduction to the geographic information system—a critical tool for management of digital archaeological data. In addition, it will provide participants with a ‘cooks tour’ of some other major geospatial technologies including remote sensing, 3-D scanning, LIDAR and photogrammetry. It assumes minimal knowledge of such technologies, and is intended to help participants to begin to develop proficiency in some of these areas.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 13 March 2015
Time: 10.00am-12.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Mick Morrison

Field Trips and Risk Assessments – 6 March 2015

University related trips beyond the campus (excluding conferences) require specific, signed, authorisation from the Dean of the School of Humanities and Creative Arts.  This includes trips for the purposes of reconnoitre, site familiarisation, research, photography, oral histories, excavations, site plan drawing and artefact collection - all of which require specific paper work. As a new researcher, finding your way through the first daunting pile of paperwork can be convoluted, and slow.  The Faculty OHS&W Officer Central WHS Consultant & Archaeological Technical Officer John Naumann will outline what is involved in the process. He will explain the forms, and help you understand the kind of thinking required in order to help make your research ideas, realistic and well documented in terms of risk assessments. He will work through common scenarios, and answer any specific questions about your own field trips.
 
This master class is designed specifically to help students who may be planning field trips for their Masters research or as part of topics such as Heritage Management Planning (ARCH8019) or Directed Studies (ARCH8403 and 8404) or for their thesis.  It will help you to understand the paperwork required and to fill it out so that your field work can be approved quickly and efficiently.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 6 March 2015
Time: 9.30am-12.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

2014

HYPACK Software Seminar - 24-25 November 2014
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 12 STUDENTS.

HYPACK, Inc. developed a Windows based software for the Hydrographic and Dredging Industry. Founded in 1984, HYPACK, INC (formerly Coastal Oceanographics, inc.) has evolved from a small hydrographic consultant to one of the most successful providers of hydrographic and navigation software worldwide. HYPACK(R) is one of the most widely used hydrographic surveying packages in the world, with more than 4.000 users. It provides the Surveyor with all the tools needed to design their survey, collect data, process it, reduce it, and generate final products. Whether you are collecting hydrographic survey data or environmental data, or just positioning your vessel in an engineering project, HYPACK(R) provides the tools needed to complete your job. With users spanning the range from small vessel with just a GPS and single beam echosounder to large survey ships with networked sensors and systems, HYPACK(R) gives you the power needed to complete your task in a system your surveyors can master. http://www.hypack.com/new/

Preference will be given to 1) ARCH8156 students 2) Maritime Archaeology students 3) Undergraduate students.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Monday 24 & Tuesday 25 November
Time: 9.00am-5:00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Bring your laptop
Contact person: Dr Jonathan Bejamin

 

Writing book reviews for publication: a joint Australian Archaeology and ArchSoc Masterclass - 14 November 2014
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 20 STUDENTS AND IS OPEN TO UNDERGRADUATES AND POSTGRADUATES

Morning tea provided by ArchSoc.
The aim of this master class is to give students practice in writing book reviews for publication in academic journals. Participants will be provided with examples and guidance, and will actually write a full draft of a review during the class. The books to be reviewed are eleven volumes of the Global Encyclopedia of Archaeology (Springer 2013), for publication in the journal Australian Archaeology, as well as selected hard copy and electronic books for ArchSoc’s journal Dig It. Book reviews are a great way to start your publishing career, as well as getting free books for your efforts!

Location: Hums 105
Date: Friday 14 November 2014
Time: 9.00 am – 1.00 pm
Cost: Free
Contact person:  Dr Alice Gorman


Using AutoCAD for Archaeological Illustrations and Maps - 7-8 November 2014
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 16 STUDENTS.

This two-day workshop aims to introduce the AutoCAD software program and its application for research and reconstruction to archaeologists. It will demonstrate how to setup and create drawings, and electronically “ink” hand-drawn site plans and artefact illustrations for reports and publications. The workshop consists of an introductory lecture, brief overview of the software program, and instructions and exercises to familiarize participants with the program. The program itself is available for students at no cost, so there is no excuse not to use it. This workshop provides participants with a basic understanding of how to produce an AutoCAD drawing, but not all functions are covered in this course. At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to set up and create a publication-quality artefact drawing in 2D. No previous AutoCAD or CAD experience is required, but all participants MUST be computer literate and be able to use Microsoft Windows to an average standard. All users should know how to use basic Windows commands such as new/open/close/print/Undo/Redo etc. and navigate around folders.  At the workshop participants will be provided with a syllabus/handbook and archaeology-specific drafting templates for future use.

Location : Flinders University, IS&T Building, Room/Lab 307
Date:
Friday 7th & Saturday 8th November
Time: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Costs: $20 handbook fee
Contact Person: Dr Wendy van Duivenvoorde

ReadiGrad Part 2 - Friday 31 October 2014
A Master Class with Mark Gregory, Flinders Careers and Employer Liaison Centre (CELC)
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

This is the second ReadiGrad session, following on from an earlier Masters Class on the 8th of August. The CELC’s new Entering Business Life Program is a self-paced program that equips students with the skills to successfully prepare for the transition from education into employment. The Program builds on formal academic learning and has three components that you can work through them at your own pace: Managing Self, Managing Culture and Managing Task. This session covers

  • Creative Job Search / Networking
  • Interview preparation
  • Assessment Centre methodology

Selection testing
Participants will also consider how to develop strategies that match the local / national expectations of Graduate Employers.

http://www.flinders.edu.au/careers/new-in-2014/new-in-2014_home.cfm

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 31 October
Time: 9.00am-11.30am
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Mick Morrison

 

Swamp Day - Friday 24 October 2014
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 12 STUDENTS.

Swamp Day is a 1-day master’s class aimed at familiarizing students with ship graveyards and the cultural heritage management of these unique areas. Of the approximately 800 shipwrecks in South Australia over 70 are classed as graveyard vessels which were abandoned deliberately in areas along the coastline (www.shipsgraveyards.sa.gov.au ). This master’s class will include a muddy tour through Garden Island Ships’ Graveyard near Port Adelaide. Be prepared to get very muddy! This course will be run by Adjunct Professor Mark Staniforth

Location: Garden Island, Port Adelaide. Meet at the Archaeology Lab (SSS  145) 8:30am (minibus) or 10.00am at Garden Island (those who go on their own)
Date: 24 October 2014
Time: 8:30am-1pm (and then go for lunch in Port Adelaide, return to campus after lunch)
Costs: For Flinders University students (proof of enrolment is required) and there is no cost; You will need lunch, water, towel, a pair of sturdy water booties and a change of clothes. You may want to wear a wet suit as you could be in mud up to your waist. Wetsuits can be checked out from the Technical Officer 48 hours in advance.   
Gear: wetsuit (long johns), wetsuit booties with thick soles (lots of sharp rusty metal), long sleeve shirt broad brim hat, water, sunscreen, insect repellent (mosquitos are BIG), large plastic bag (to put all your muddy gear in).
Contact person:  Mick Morrison


Introduction to the Total Station – 17 October
Back (again) by popular demand!
A Master Class with professional surveyor, Rob Koch
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 8 STUDENTS.  

This Master Class will be a basic ‘how to’ session on setting up and using a total station to survey a site and record spatial data in the field.  It will cover:

  1. Data Dictionary - what are we picking up and what are we calling it?
  2. The Total Station and its components.
  3. The elements required to know where you are.
  4. Setting up and recording data.
  5. Down loading and reduction of observations.
  6. Fixing the stuff ups (should not be necessary!).

Rob Koch is an adjunct member of the Flinders Archaeology Department and a professional surveyor who also taught surveying for many years at TAFE.  He has worked extensively with archaeologists around Australia.

Location: 
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 17 October 2014
Time:
10.00pm-4.00pm
Costs: 
Nil
Contact person: 
Mick Morrison

ReadiGrad Part 1 - Friday 10 October
A Master Class with Mark Gregory, Flinders Careers and Employer Liaison Centre (CELC)
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

CELC’s new Entering Business Life Program is a self-paced program that equips students with the skills to successfully prepare for the transition from education into employment. The Program builds on formal academic learning and has three components that you can work through them at your own pace: Managing Self, Managing Culture and Managing Task. This week, Mark Gregory will present the first of two Masters Classes related to this program. This session will cover;

  • Cover Letter development
  • Tailored resumes / CVs
  • Extended Cover letters
  • Addressing Selection Criteria
  • Digital footprint management

Additionally, participants will undertake a pre-task that introduces our Entering Business Life Program. This self-paced program equips students with the skills to successfully prepare for the transition from education into employment.
http://www.flinders.edu.au/careers/new-in-2014/new-in-2014_home.cfm

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 10 October
Time: 9.00am-11.30am
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil  
Contact person: Mick Morrison


Media Interviewing Techniques - Friday 19 September
This Master Class is presented by the Marketing and Communications News and Media Team.
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 5 STUDENTS.  
 
Building on the ‘Introduction to the Media’ Master Class in August, this Master Class will focus on how you can get your message across most effectively to the media and say a lot in a ‘30 second grab’, while also remaining calm and avoiding ‘bear traps’.  This session will use mock television interviews that are recorded, replayed and analysed by the News and Media team.  Past experience indicates that participants find these interviews both terrifying and fun in equal parts. But participants almost always emerge with a greater understanding of the media and greater confidence to deal with it.
 
Location:  Meet at Anchor Court (Biological Sciences)
Date: Friday 19 September 2014
Time: 10.30am-12pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Mick Morrison
Click here to sign up

 

 Digital Archaeology (in plain English) - Friday 12 September 2014
A master class with Dr. Mick Morrison

Digital methods are increasingly becoming a core aspect of archaeology and cultural heritage management, whether it is in the field, in the lab or in the office. We use computer software to plan field work and once we hit the paddock or water we draw on digital tools like total stations, digital cameras and GPS devices to collect the data we use. We use digital media to share news about our work with others and most of our publications now appear digitally first and in hard copy second. In short, digital methods have dramatically altered the way that we do archaeology and the way that we share our results with others. It can take a little time to get your head around the wide range of approaches and concepts relevant to digital methods in archaeology so this Masters Class aims to provide an introduction and overview of some of the major approaches, key terms and issues and to give you some ideas about how you might use various digital methods in your own research. It assumes you can turn on a computer, but beyond that we assume nothing. So all are welcome.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 12 September 2014
Time:
10.00am-12pm
Costs:
There is no cost.
Equipment:
Nil
Contact person:
Mick Morrison

Senior First Aid - 29 August
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 15 STUDENTS.
Senior First Aid is a 1-day Master Class aimed at training students in the most recent program in First Aid.  First Aid is a very useful certificate for archaeologists working in the field because you never know when you might need it. 

If you have NEVER done First Aid before it is STRONGLY RECOMMENDED that you spend some time going through the pre-course review pack at: http://pfa.stjohn.org.au

GENERAL INFORMATION: Wear comfortable and appropriate clothing, as you will need to undertake activities such as bending, kneeling and lying on the floor.
Electronic certificates will be issued immediately after your course if you have supplied us with an email address.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Function Centre (below the Media and Communications Office)
Date:  Friday 29 August 2014
Time:  9am-5pm
Costs: Price to be determined
Contact person:  Chantal Wight


Introduction to the Media - Friday 22 August
This Master Class is presented by the Marketing and Communications News and Media Team.
THIS MASTERCLASS IS RESTRICTED TO 10 STUDENTS.  

PLEASE NOTE:  Students attending this master class are required to bring with them a 1-2 paragraph description of their research focus, or a project that they have recently worked on (please bring printed copies). This will form the basis of the “how to write a media release” section of the master class.
 
Why does the media think the way it does, what makes news, and how can you approach the media and make it work for you?  The public is fascinated by archaeology, making it a prime target for media attention—so much so that the 2010 national survey of professional archaeologists identified media training as one of the key skills gaps in current training.  Presented by the Flinders Marketing and Communications team of experienced journalists, this Master Class will demystify the media, explain the way it works and provide you with the skills and confidence to engage effectively with journalists across the print, broadcast and internet media.  Specifically, you will learn how to:

  • identify news and newsworthiness in the archaeological field
  • present stories that attract the media's attention
  • draft effective media releases
  • engage with journalists (and by extension the general public) more effectively.

Training involves hands on exercises undertaken with live stories from participants and presenters.

This Master Class will be followed by a second, more intensive class in September on how to handle media interviews.
 
Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 22 August 2014
Time: 10.30am-12pm
Costs: Nil
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  Mick Morrison
Website: http://www.flinders.edu.au/marketing-communications/training-and-support/media-training-and-support/media-training-and-support_home.cfm

How Old Is It? – Friday 1 August
A Master Class with Dr Alan Watchman
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY APPLY.

How do archaeologists determine the source of a stone artefact?  This class will focus on describing and explaining the mineralogical and geochemical techniques used in provenance studies.  What are the benefits and limitations of the methods?  The class will also examine sampling strategies, within and between source variability, basic geological aspects and analytical errors.  Some knowledge of the scientific methods including XRD, Infrared spectroscopy, pXRF, XRF, PIXE/PIGME, Neutron activation, laser ablation ICPMS, LIBS etc would be advantageous, but not essential.

This class is designed to give students a better understanding of the science behind provenance studies that are useful for stone tools and applicable to glass, ceramics and metals.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 1 August 2014
Time: 10am-12pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  Mick Morrison

Researching and Recording Anchors  6 June
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Anchors are said to be the potsherds of archaeology, but are they really? Anchors are an incredibly useful tool for dating shipwrecks—if not intrusive to a site—and they provide a wealth of information to archaeologists, ranging from clues on a ship’s sinking, geophysical or metallurgical sciences, to seamanship in general. If you have ever wondered how anchors developed throughout history, how to record archaeological or historic anchors, and how properly to refer to their parts, then come to this master class and get some hands on experience.

Location: HUMN112
Date: Friday 6 June 2014
Time: 10am–4pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Pack a lunch and wear clothes suitable for traveling around town
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

 

 Oral History Interviewing for Archaeologists – 23 May
A Master Class by professional historian, Dr Susan Marsden
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Susan Marsden is the former president of the Professional Historians Association of South Australia (http://www.sahistorians.org.au/) and current president of the History Council of South Australia, as well as being a highly-experienced history and heritage consultant on national, state and local projects, including writing short and long commissioned histories, carrying out heritage studies, curating exhibitions and oral history interviews. She has been responsible for recording more than 200 oral history interviews, including as an ongoing interviewer of the National Library of Australia, the State Library of South Australia and the City of Onkaparinga.
This Master Class will provide the historian’s perspective on the value of oral history, and will introduce participants to the difference between oral history (what historians do) and casual oral interviewing (which tends to be what archaeologists do). It will cover the some of the practices and methods of oral history as a particular way of accessing the past, including guidelines for interviewing, ethical issues to be aware of and the importance of archiving interview materials.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 23 May 2014
Time: 10.00 – 12.00 pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Digital Engagement for Heritage Specialists  16 May
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This master class will provide an introduction to using modern digital technology to connect people with heritage and culture. This class is ideal for students wanting to learn how to use social media in a professional manner, in order to effectively engage with and inspire the public. It is also suitable for existing heritage professionals wanting to use social media in a structured way to create measureable impact. Learn how to professionally manage an online presence for an organisation, embed digital engagement into projects, and use your own social media presence to boost your career. This master class aims to teach how to use digital media in a more effective way thereby making you more valuable to current or future employers.

Outline of the master class:
•    Introduction to web 2.0 – where are we now?
•    Social media channels – which is the right tool for the job?
•    A closer look at mobile technology – using smartphones in smarter ways
•    Digital engagement strategies – plan what you want to achieve and how you will get there
•    Metrics – understanding what success looks like.

Location:
Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:
Friday 16th May
Time:
10am – 1pm
Costs:
There is no cost
Equipment:
Bring your smartphone or tablet if you have one.
Contact person:
Amy Dale

The Victorian Aboriginal Heritage System: Is it the Future for South Australia? – 9 May
A Master Class by Oona Nicholson, Director, Ecology and Heritage Partners Pty Ltd
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

In this master class Oona will explain how the Victorian Aboriginal heritage system works, including Cultural Heritage Management Plans, Due Diligence reports, and Registered Aboriginal Parties. What does the heritage manager or developer need to know? Aspects of the Victorian legislation have been suggested as a model for proposed changes to the South Australian Aboriginal Heritage Act 1988, which is currently under review, as well as other state acts around Australia. The advantages and disadvantages of each legislation are explored to give you a perspective on the state of play of Aboriginal heritage legislation in Australia. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a Q & A at the end of the session.

Whether you’re a student, a consultant, in industry or in government, this master class is a must for anyone who wants to understand how legislation translates into action and how the specifics of Aboriginal heritage legislation around Australia is changing.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 9 May 2014
Time: 10.00 – 1.00 pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

 

City of Adelaide behind the Scenes Tour – 3 May
Excursion to the City of Adelaide clipper ship in Port Adelaide and guided tour by Peter Christopher around and possibly inside the ship. Max. 12 students. Maritime archaeology students have preference.
Location: Depart from Humanities Car Park 5
Date: Saturday 3 may 2014
Time: 8:00am - return to campus 1pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde


Specialist Library Skills for Independent Research – 2 May

UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

If you think you already know everything about the library, this master class will show you how much more you have to learn.  Delivered by the Humanities Liaison Librarian, Aliese Millington, this master class is designed specifically to assist graduate students who are undertaking independent research for Directed Studies, research methods, Masters or PhD theses, or any other research-based assignments.  It will show you how to use electronic and library resources more effectively, introduce you to some sources that you may not know about, and is a must for anyone who wants to succeed in their research.

Location: Flinders Campus, Central Library, Computer Lab 2
Date: Friday 2 May 2014
Time: 10am-12noon
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Aliese Millington

 

The Federated Archaeological Information Management System (FAIMS): What It Is and How To Use It – 11 April
A Master Class by Dr Shawn Ross and Dr Adela Sobotkova, UNSW

FAIMS (https://www.fedarch.org/wordpress/) is a comprehensive information system that has been designed specifically by archaeologists for archaeologists. It allows you to collect digital data in the field and the laboratory using mobile Android devices (phones and tablets), process it in local databases, extract it to a data warehouse suitable for sophisticated analysis, and then exchange it online through cultural heritage registries and data repositories. The FAIMS system will be a must for anyone working in the field – it will save you time, prevent double handling of data (paper to electronic) and allow you to analyse your data spatially via a web app (Heurist).

The first Master Class will introduce you to the FAIMS mobile application, while the second will build on this to provide more in depth tuition in how to design modules for recording tailored to your own projects.

PART 1: Basic User Workshop: The FAIMS mobile application
The FAIMS mobile application is a tool for recording archaeological (and in fact any other kind of research) data in the field. It will work on any Android 4.0+ device and has the following key features:
•    Customisable recording modules to create and edit data directly on the device (data schemas and user inferfaces are created using XML definition files).
•    Full versioning (the ability to review and, if necessary, reverse all changes made to a dataset).
•    Lightweight mapping for drawing archaeological features (vectors), tracking survey paths and displaying geo-referenced raster files.
•    Synchronisation and backup across multiple mobile devices and a local server (which can run on a moderately priced laptop).
•    Everything works offline and disconnected, including the GIS!

The basic user workshop will teach students how to download the FAIMS app, how to connect to the proper server to download the right modules for your fieldwork, how to work using the app, how to synchronize data, and more.

PART 2: Intermediate User Workshop: FAIMS mobile application design

This higher level workshop includes training in mobile application design, module creation via the FAIMS server, deployment to devices, data collection and editing on your device or the server, and module editing on the server. It is more intensive and hands-on.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 11 April 2014
Time: 9.00am-5.00pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil – BUT IF YOU HAVE AN ANDROID DEVICE (TABLET OR PHONE) PLEASE BRING IT ALONG.  THIS IS THE ONLY EQUIPMENT YOU WILL NEED BUT THE NUMBER OF DEPARTMENTAL DEVICES ARE LIMITED.
Contact person: Heather Burke


Field Trips and Risk Assessments – 4 April

University related trips beyond the campus (excluding conferences) require specific, signed, authorisation from the Faculty Executive Dean.  This includes trips for the purposes of reconnoitre, site familiarisation, research, photography, oral histories, excavations, site plan drawing and artefact collection - all of which require specific paper work. As a new researcher, finding your way through the first daunting pile of paperwork can be convoluted, and slow.  The Faculty OHS&W Officer & Archaeological Technical Officer John Naumann will outline what is involved in the process. He will explain the forms, and help you understand the kind of thinking required in order to help make your research ideas, realistic and well documented in terms of risk assessments. He will work through common scenarios, and answer any specific questions about your own field trips.

This master class is designed specifically to help students who may be planning field trips for their Masters research or as part of topics such as Heritage Management Planning (ARCH8019) or Directed Studies (ARCH8403 and 8404) or for their thesis.  It will help you to understand the paperwork required and to fill it out so that your field work can be approved quickly and efficiently.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 4 April 2014
Time: 9.30am-12.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: John Naumann

 

Yorke Peninsula Saltwater Classic - 5 April

The Yorke Peninsula’s Saltwater Classic is a special event designed to tap into growing national and international appreciation and enjoyment of vessels of a bygone era. These vessels have been faithfully restored by their owners, and they showcase the skills and styles of boat builders from last century. The Australian Maritime Museum defines a classic boat as any vessel with unique and enduring qualities.  This free event attracts people from across Australia to parade their boats in the waters off the sister towns of Stansbury and Port Vincent, and it draws spectators to a variety of water-based and shore-based events. The ever popular Stansbury Seaside Market is held on the Sunday of the Regatta weekend so forms part of the activities. You can also browse stalls along the beachfront where the boats come in to the beach. On the Saturday there will be a mini-market in the Port Vincent Town Hall.  Bring your lunch!     http://www.ypsaltwaterclassic.org.au/

Location: Depart from Humanities Car Park 5
Date:
Saturday 5 April 2014
Time: 8:00am - return to campus 5-6pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Bring your lunch
Contact person: Wendy van Duivenvoorde

The Origins of Modern Australians – 28 March 2014
A Master Class with Fulbright Senior Scholar, Dr Arthur Durband
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

The study of modern human origins in Australia has a long history. Throughout much of this history, workers interested in the origins of the Australians have often focused on scenarios that invoke multiple founding populations for the modern inhabitants of this continent. For example, “The mark of ancient Java” has long been thought to link populations like the Ngandong fossils to both fossil and modern Australian Aboriginals. More recently, genetic evidence has suggested that the Denisovans contributed genes to modern Australian populations, suggesting that at least some admixture did take place in Southeast Asia and Australasia. This class will summarize our current understanding of modern human origins in Australasia and examine a series of hypotheses that could reconcile the potentially conflicting evidence from the fossils and ancient DNA.

This class is designed to give students an overview of the current state of our understanding of the fossil and genetic evidence for modern human origins in Australia. The evidence presented here will be relevant to many research problems dealing with the initial peopling of Australia.

Arthur Durband is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at Texas Tech University and a Visiting Research Fellow at the South Australian Museum. He is currently an Australian-American Fulbright Senior Scholar. His research focuses on modern human origins and the peopling of Australia.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 28 March 2014
Time: 9.30am-11.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

How Old Is It? – 21 March 2014
A Master Class with Dr Alan Watchman
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

How do archaeologists determine the age of artefacts and rock art?  This class will focus on dating techniques, including carbon-14, luminescence and uranium-series.  What is the science behind the methods and what can go wrong?  Infamous case studies for dating sediments at archaeological sites, artefacts, petroglyphs and pictographs will be discussed to expose what needs to be done, and what not, to obtain reliable age determinations.  Some knowledge of these dating methods would be advantageous, but it is not essential.

This class is designed to give students a better understanding of the advantages and limitations of these techniques, and how to decide which method is appropriate.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date: Friday 21 March 2014
Time: 10am-12pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person: Heather Burke

Cultural Issues for Archaeologists Working with Aboriginal Communities – 14 March 2014
A Master Class by Kim McCaul and Major Sumner
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

This cross-cultural awareness session will consider various critical cultural issues that archaeologists should be aware of when working with Aboriginal communities. Topics covered will include cross-cultural competency, Aboriginal perspectives of archaeology and the maintenance of good community relationships.  Kim McCaul has worked as an anthropologist at the Native Title Section of the South Australian Crown Solicitor's Office, where he had extensive opportunity to work with contemporary Australian Aboriginal societies, and now works as a professional consultant.  Major Sumner is a prominent Ngarrindjeri elder, who is involved in all aspects of Indigenous affairs in South Australia.

Location:  Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  14 March 2014
Time:  10:00am – 12:30pm
Costs:  There is no cost.
Contact person: Amy Roberts


Archaeology Laboratory OHS Induction Session – 14 March 2014
UNDERGRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Any undergraduate or graduate student who wishes to access the Archaeology Laboratories in Social Science South (such as to gain experience in laboratory sorting as a volunteer, to access the collections or use the computers) will not be allowed to do so unless they have completed a compulsory OHS Induction Session.  This session will cover basic occupational health and safety requirements in relation to Flinders University laboratory policy, procedures and regulations.

Location: Flinders Campus, Humanities 112 (Archaeology Lab)
Date:  Friday 14 March 2014
Time:  1.30pm-3.30pm
Costs: There is no cost.
Equipment: Nil
Contact person:  John Naumann

Designing Professional Posters for Conferences and Community Groups – 7 March 2014
A Master Class by consultant archaeologist and editor of Australian Archaeology, Dr Lynley Wallis
UNDERGRADUATES, GRADUATES AND COLLEAGUES AFFILIATED WITH THE FLINDERS UNIVERSITY ARCHAEOLOGY DEPARTMENT MAY ATTEND.

Thinking of presenting a poster at NASC, AIMA, ASHA or AAA this year? If so, then this Master Class is for you! Designed to teach you the bas