Life Narrative Research Group


The Life Narrative Research Group
is a community of researchers at Flinders University who share an active interest in life writing, memoir, autobiography, biography, epistolarity, digital narratives of self and subjectivity, and other forms that fit under the banner of Life Narrative. The group organises conferences, master classes, guest lectures, symposia, and reading groups to facilitate a productive environment for the development and exchange of life narrative research.

Members

Directors:

Kate Douglas is an Associate Professor in English, Creative Writing and Australian Studies. Her research interests include: childhood/youth and life narrative, the intersections of trauma and life writing, and developing methodologies for teaching life narrative.

Kylie Cardell is a Senior Lecturer in English and Creative Writing at Flinders University. Her research interests are focused in contemporary life writing and she has a particular interest in marginal genres and forms of life writing.


Other Academic Staff:

Patrick Allington is a lecturer in the School of Humanities and Creative Arts at Flinders University. His novel Figurehead (Black Inc. 2009) was longlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award, and his short fiction, essays, columns, profiles and extensive critical writings have been widely published in journals, magazines and newspapers. In the June 2011 edition of Australian Book Review he published a major essay on the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Patrick is co-editor of Griffith Review 55, 'State of Hope', on South Australia (to be published February 2017).

Tully Barnett is a Research Fellow in Creative Arts in the School of Humanities and Creative Arts. She is Associate Director for the Australasian Consortium of Humanities Research Centres (ACHRC). She is a Research Fellow on the ARC Linkage project Laboratory Adelaide: The Value of Culture looking for qualitative and quantitative methodologies for measuring and reporting the intangible and non-financial benefits of cultural activities, institutions and events. In addition, she researches literary engagements with new technologies, digital humanities, and life writing. She is a member of the Life Narrative Research Group and is co-convener of the 2016 Flinders Institute for Research in the Humanities (FIRtH) theme "Technologies of Memory and Affect ".

Danielle Clode writes creative non-fiction and historical biography and lectures in creative writing at Flinders University. Her recent books include Voyages to the South Seas, a creative biography of French explorers and scientists in Australia, which won the Victorian Premier’s Literary Award for Non-fiction.  She has broad interests in non-fiction genres and representations of past lives through fiction and non-fiction.

Natalie Edwards (The University of Adelaide) holds a PhD from Northwestern University and was Associate Professor of French at Wagner College, New York City, before becoming Senior Lecturer in French Studies at the University of Adelaide.   She is a specialist in contemporary women’s autobiography and has written two books and seven edited volumes on this topic.  At the University of Adelaide she has received a Faculty of Arts Award for Excellence in Teaching, the Executive Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and the university-wide Stephen Cole the Elder Award for Excellence in Teaching. She was recently the recipient of an Office of Learning and Teaching Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning.

Julia Erhart is an Associate Professor in the School of Humanities and Creative Arts at Flinders University. She researches in the areas of contemporary women filmmakers and feminist and LGBT iterations in film and television. Her book Gendering History on Screen: Women Filmmakers and Historical Films is in press (IB Tauris 2016). Essays by her on these subjects appear in anthologies from McFarland (Queer TV in the Twenty-First Century 2016), SUNY (Invented Lives, Imagined Communities: Biopics and American National Identity 2016), and Palgrave (Queer Love in Film and Television 2013), and in journals which include Continuum, Continuum, a/b: Auto/Biography, Screening the Past and many others. With School colleagues, Julia currently co-leads the Flinders Institute for Research in the Humanities research theme, Technologies of Memory and Affect.

Jane Haggis is an Associate Professor in the School of International Studies and teaches in the Development Studies Discipline. Her research interests are the politics of knowledge; colonial pasts/postcolonial presents; critical race and whiteness theory; and contemporary models of cross-cultural practice. She is currently working on a book titled Storying the Borderlands. Transnational imaginaries of modernity in refugee settlement.

Lorna Hallahan is a Senior Lecturer in Social Work and Social Planning. Her research interests include: the ethics of public consultation; the link between personal narratives and public policy; assistive technology and the stories of people living with disability.

Leonie Hardcastle is a Research Associate who undertook her English major and doctoral thesis within the School of Humanities and Creative Arts. She provides sessional lectures in the Schools of International Studies and Social and Policy Studies. Current projects include collecting and writing stories through which South Australian workers reflect upon lived experiences during socio-economic, cultural and workplace change.

Christopher Hogarth (The University of South Australia) holds a PhD from Northwestern University and was Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature at Wagner College, New York City, before becoming Lecturer in French Studies at the University of South Australia.   He is a specialist in Senegalese literature written in French and Italian and has published several articles and volumes on this topic

Christèle Maizonniaux is a Lecturer in the School of Humanities and Creative Arts at Flinders University. Christele is an innovator who embraces the heterogeneity of her student groups by taking into account their cultural, linguistic and epistemological backgrounds. Accordingly, her pedagogical range is particularly comprehensive, encompassing applied linguistics (language-in-education) and children’s literature and culture. Narratives of migration and expatriation, as realised in travel writing, stories of exile, and diasporic literature, are central in her research interests and practice and threaded where relevant through her teaching. Christele also brings within her compass youth literature and culture, creative writing, foreign language life narrative, technology-enhanced learning and francophonie. Her research proceeds from this broad base and at present involves two projects: one on online collaborative writing and autobiography; the other on the place and role of African Francophonie in Australian universities. Gathering together many of these interests, she is completing a book examining the contribution of children's literature to the learning and teaching of foreign languages.

Threasa Meads is a writer, artist and PhD Candidate. Her first memoir, ‘Nobody’, was shortlisted for The Australian/Vogel Literary Award in 2008 as well as being awarded a Text/Varuna Publisher Fellowship in 2009. Her research interests include: the theory and practice of contemporary life writing; the intersection of therapy and aesthetics in trauma/healing narratives; and the theory and practice of visual and digital life narratives.


Postgraduates:

Alicia Carter is a PhD candidate in Creative Writing. Her current research explores notions of gendered landscapes, the monstrous feminine, and conceptions of monstrous motherhood. Her research and writing interests also include folklore and fairy tales, as well as family histories and the myths we make from them.

Grace Chipperfield is a PhD candidate in Creative Writing at Flinders University. She is researching what it is to be an American citizen and how this relates to adolescence and adulthood in the works of David Foster Wallace. She also teaches in English Literature at Flinders University.

Pamela Graham is a PhD candidate in the School of Humanities at Flinders University. Her research interests include the social and political significance of life narratives, cultural memory, contemporary postcolonial literature and film, and the impact of technology on biographical and historical narratives.

Sharyn Kaesehagen is a PhD candidate in Creative Writing. Her research topic is 'Autobiographical Performances: The Writing of Women's Contemporary Knit-Lit' and includes a creative manuscript: "The Knitter-A Memoir". 

Hannah Kent is a PhD Candidate in Creative Writing, and co-founder of the literary journal Kill Your Darlings. Her research interests include: the intersections of biography and fiction, life narratives of criminal women, and biographical research.

Tiffany Lyndall Knight is a freelance actor, director and Scholarly Fellow in Drama. She teaches Stanislavski and Shakespeare for the Drama Workshop program, as well as screen acting and dialects in Flinders Drama Centre. Her PhD research focuses on the creation and performance of autobiographic monodramas.

Sandra Lindemann is a writer specialising in collaborative life writing. She is a current PhD candidate in the School of English, Creative Writing and Australian Studies. Her research examines the ethical challenges experienced by practitioners of collaborative life writing.

Emma Maguire is a PhD candidate in English Literature at Flinders University. Her research interests include life writing practices of young women, and the intersection of life narrative scholarship and affect theory/intimate publics.

Michele McCrea completed her doctorate at Flinders University and is currently extending her thesis research on narrative voice and textual authority in post-colonial fiction by women writers to investigate hybrid genres and the borders between genres, particularly life narrative and fiction. She has published short stories and a prize-winning novella.

Melanie Pryor is a Creative Writing PhD candidate at Flinders University. Her research interests include: embodiment and place in contemporary memoir, memory studies, feminist writing about the body, and experimental forms of non-fiction.

Amanda Williams has recently completed a Masters Degree in Creative Writing, concentrating on women’s autobiographical fiction with research into feminist appropriation of the Blues as autobiography. Amanda is currently a Creative Writing PhD Candidate researching notions of place and space and specifically heterotopias as sites of local and global subjective transformation. She teaches in Academic and Professional Communication at Flinders University.