New book explores unique sense of place in Australia

 

 
The Fiction of Thea Astley, available from Cambria Press


Emeritus Professor Susan Sheridan, School of Humanities and Creative Arts, will have her new book, The Fiction of Thea Astley, launched at Flinders in the City on 19 August 2016. The book is a spin-off from Sheridan’s ARC-funded research on the early careers of a cohort of Australian women writers, including Astley, which was published in 2011 as Nine Lives: Postwar women writing making their mark.

The Fiction of Thea Astley explores the four-time Miles Franklin winner’s novels, whose distinctive appeal comes from their unique sense of place, in tropical Queensland and the South Pacific, and from the mordant irony of Astley’s gaze on Australian society.

“Place and people reflect one another as her characters, social outsiders and creative misfits, seem to live on the edge of a cyclone, facing the threat of personal annihilation with the frail weapons of irony, satire and anarchic humour. As her interest in the history of these post-colonial locations deepened, Astley imbued her landscapes with a necessary political dimension. In her later novels, the focus is on the cyclone’s aftermath, on people living in a devastated physical and emotional environment,” said Sheridan.

Professor Diana Glenn, Dean, School of Humanities and Creative Arts, will host the event, with Professor Amanda Nettelbeck, University of Adelaide, launching the book. Register here for the event. The book can be purchased from Cambria Press

Story from the July edition, Inspiring Research

 

Torrens Island Internment featured on the ABC

 
Interned: Torrens Island 1914-1915 is available from Wakefield Press


ABC Radio National recently broadcast a feature on Professor Peter Monteath’s, School of History and International Relations, research into the Torrens Island Internment Camp. The two part feature was based on the book, Interned: Torrens Island 1914-1915 released last year from Wakefield Press by Monteath, Mandy Paul and Rebecca Martin.

Further to the book release, the Migration Museum also held an exhibition from August 2015 to October 2015 featuring photographs and insights from the camp prisoners - the photographer Paul Dubotzki and the diarist Frank Bungardy.

The features can be listened to online or downloaded from the ABC Radio National Earshot web pages:

Torrens Island: concentration Part 1

Torrens Island: concentration Part 2


Story from the June edition, Inspiring Research

 

Flinders Inaugural Speaker at University College Dublin


Dr Dymphna Lonergan, English, Creative Writing, and Australian Studies Department, gave the inaugural lecture in University College Dublin’s Irish Studies in a Global Context lecture series in Dublin on March 31.


The lecture series is the initiative of the School of Irish, Celtic Studies and Folklore at University College Dublin. The Head, Dr Regina Uí Chollatáin, had read Lonergan’s book, Sounds Irish: the Irish Language in Australia, and on hearing that Lonergan would be in Dublin for the centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising, arranged for the Global Irish Studies lecture series to coincide with her visit.

Lonergan spoke about her research into the Irish language in Australia that was the subject of her PhD at Flinders, and key moments in her migration experience that were influential in developing her research interests. She related how her studies in Australian English at Flinders were influential in her embarking on a PhD.Having been schooled in the Irish language, Lonergan observed Irish words in Australian English, and became aware that no one had researched this influence on Australian English. Her PhD findings included words such as brumby, didgeridoo, sheila, and shiralee, among others, as being Irish in origin.

Among attendees at the lecture was the Irish Ambassador-Elect to Australia, Breandán Ó Caollaí and Professor Erik Ecklund, Keith Cameron Chair of Australian History at University College Dublin’s Australian Studies Centre.

Story from the June edition, Inspiring Research

 

Worlds of Imagination: A comparative study of film tourism

 
Prof Reijnders and Dr Kim in Rotterdam


Dr Sean Kim, School of Humanities and Creative Arts, will join a successful 2015 European Research Council (ERC) Consolidator Grant, Worlds of Imagination, led by Professor Stijn Reijnders, Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

This project will receive 1.9 million Euros for the next 5 years (2016-2020), and aims to explore more generic processes and relationships of power involved in the development and experience of film tourism worldwide.

The principal question underlying this project is: why, under what conditions and in which ways do films, and TV series give rise to new and diverse tourism flows across the globe? This question is addressed by analysing and comparing film tourism in five geographically and culturally different contexts: South Korea, Nigeria, Jamaica, India and the U.S. These five cases will be subjected to the same lines of inquiry, focusing on 1) the visual traditions in the local media cultures; 2) the effect of local policies aimed at developing film tourism; 3) the commonalities and differences in motives and experiences of film tourists with diverse backgrounds.

Kim will lead the South Korean sub-project with a newly recruited PhD candidate through the Cotutelle Doctorate Program. Kim’s involvement will include PhD candidate recruitment, PhD supervision, participation in kick-off and final conferences in Rotterdam, academic workshop in Korea, research publications, and more.

Story from the June edition, Inspiring Research

 

Space Archaeologist talks at the Global Art Forum in Dubai

 

Vintage Vanguard

Flinders digital media lecturer and researcher, Dr Sonja Vivienne, has recently published her first monograph, Digital Identity and Everyday Activism with Palgrave Macmillan.

Flinders space archaeologist Dr Alice Gorman, School of Humanities and Creative Arts, was invited to speak at the Global Art Forum in March 2016. The Forum, in its 10th year, was held as part of the Art Dubai fair on the theme The Future Was. Dr Gorman presented alongside such luminaries of the art world as Glenn Lowry, the Director of New York’s Museum of Modern Art, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Director of International Projects at the Serpentine Gallery in London.

The Forum, held over 5 days, features invited speakers from diverse positions, such as artists, curators, strategists, thinkers and writers to present and debate on the theme.

Dr Gorman spoke about the future of space junk. She imagined a world where the Kessler Syndrome – a cascade of space junk collisions creating an impenetrable shell around the Earth – cuts humans off from access to space. The Solar System is abandoned; satellites fall silent, and the lunar landing undergo slow decay until they are turned to dust. On the other hand, she argued, space junk could be transformative, providing resources for orbital industries that will lead to mega-scale engineering projects in space.

See the Forum for more information.

Story from the April edition, Inspiring Research

 

New Book - Ageing Between Cultures

 

Ageing Between Cultures: The experiences and challenges of Italian migrants in South Australia

Flinders Italian senior lecturer and researcher, Dr Daniela Rose, has recently published the edited book Ageing between cultures: The experiences and challenges of Italian migrants in South Australia with Troubador Publishing.

This interdisciplinary volume, supported by a Faculty of Education, Humanities and Law Faculty Grant, addresses the multiple dimensions of the ageing experience of the Italian migrant community in South Australia, which is the largest ethnic ageing group in Australia.

Drawing on the expertise of historians, migration scholars, social scientists and a medical practitioner, this volume offers an overview of the origin of the Italian settlement in South Australia. It addresses the ageing experience of Italian migrants by revisiting the concepts of health and wellbeing, intergenerational family care-giving practices and the role of language and culture in the ageing process.

At a time when the world’s population is ageing at a rapid rate, this comprehensive study on an elderly migrant minority, their families and communities, is a valuable contribution to the literature of migration and ageing and serves as a framework for the development of aged care models for other migrant communities.

Contributors to the volume include Karen Agutter, Professor Desmond O’Connor (School of Humanities and Creative Arts), Professor Diana Glenn (School of Humanities and Creative Arts), Daniela Cosmini-Rose, Irene Belperio, Daniela Costa, Francesca Bouvet, Dr Kenneth Goodall (School of Education), Dr Lareen Newman (School of Health Sciences), Professor Paul Ward (School of Public Health) and Tony Paganoni.

The volume is now available in the library or to order here:

Story from the April edition, Inspiring Research

 

 

Digital Identity and Everyday Activism

 

Digital Identity and Everyday Activism: Sharing Private Stories with Networked Publics, Palgrave Macmillan 2016.

Flinders digital media lecturer and researcher, Dr Sonja Vivienne, has recently published her first monograph, Digital Identity and Everyday Activism with Palgrave Macmillan.

The book describes intimate advocacy online and complicates utopian claims of digitally facilitated liberation by detailing the numerous obstacles stigmatized storytellers confront when creating and sharing revealing stories in networked public places. It’s now available in the library or to order here:

Building on this work Sonja is currently facilitating a series of social media storytelling workshops with the trans* and gender-diverse community in Adelaide, funded by a grant from Community Benefits SA. Some of the groups’ creative work can be viewed at beyondgender

“Something has taken flight in this book. Arriving at ‘intimate citizenship (3.0)’ is not just an intellectual, personal and civic achievement’ it’s a fine bit of storytelling too.”

From the Foreword by John Hartley, Curtin University, Australia and Cardiff University, UK

The project has also been supported by an EHL Faculty Grant to explore the obstacles and opportunities at the heart of online advocacy and support for gender-diverse people, as perceived by educators and social service providers.

Story from the February edition, Inspiring Research

 

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