Published books in 2016 - 2017:

Click on the book cover image to go direct to the Publisher.

 
 

Author:
Peter Monteath

2017

 

Escape Artist: The incredible Second World War of Johnny Peck

The never-before-told story of World War II escape artist extraordinaire, Johnny Peck. 

In August 1941, an eighteen-year-old Australian soldier made his first prison break – an audacious night-time escape from a German prisoner-of-war camp in Crete. Astoundingly, this was only the first of many escapes.

Historian Peter Monteath reveals the action-packed tale of one young Australian soldier and his remarkable war. 

 

Authors:
Heather Burke, Michael Morrison and Claire Smith

2017

 

The Archaeologist's Field Handbook: The essential guide for beginners and professionals in Australia

The complete manual to archaeological field work in Australia, fully revised to incorporate digital techniques and new methods. With step-by-step guidelines, it is an essential companion for consultants, amateur heritage researchers and students.

This second edition is updated throughout and incorporates strategies for digital data capture, improved methods, recent legislation and more affordable technologies for surveying and photography. The Archaeologist's Field Handbook remains the ultimate resource for consultants, teachers, students, community groups and anyone involved in heritage fieldwork.

Author:
Julian Meyrick

2017

 

 

Australian Theatre after the New Wave: Policy, Subsidy and the Alternative Artist

In Australian Theatre after the New Wave, Julian Meyrick charts the history of three ground-breaking Australian theatre companies, the Paris Theatre (1978), the Hunter Valley Theatre (1976-94) and Anthill Theatre (1980-94). In the years following the controversial dismissal of Gough Whitlam’s Labor government in 1975, these ‘alternative’ theatres struggled to survive in an increasingly adverse economic environment. Drawing on interviews and archival sources, including Australia Council files and correspondence, the book examines the funding structures in which the companies operated, and the impact of the cultural policies of the period. It analyses the changing relationship between the artist and the State, the rise of a managerial ethos of ‘accountability’, and the growing dominance of government in the fate of the nation’s theatre. In doing so, it shows the historical roots of many of the problems facing Australian theatre today.

 

Author:
William Peterson

2016

 

Places for Happiness

Places for Happiness explores two of the most important performance-based activities in the Philippines: the processions and Passion Plays associated with Easter and the mass-dance phenomenon known as "street dancing." The scale of these hand-crafted performances in terms of duration, time commitment, and productive labor marks the Philippines as one of the world's most significant and undervalued performance-centered cultures. Drawing on a decade of fieldwork, William Peterson examines how people come together in the streets or on temporary stages, celebrating a shared sense of community and creating places for happiness.

Edited by:
Diana Glenn and Graham Tulloch

2016

 

Border Crossings

Crossing borders, breaking boundaries, going beyond the limits, entering new territories - today these take many forms and are major preoccupations of our world. Whether the borders are real or imagined, historical or contemporary, physical or psychological, they continue to fascinate us. The twenty-two chapters in this book explore the phenomenon of border crossing in some of its manifold forms. The chapters range across a wide spectrum of border crossings from the ages of chivalry, Dante, Shakespeare and Darwin, through to the era of comics, world music, transcultural writing, mash-up novels, and digital libraries. Studies of life writing, the performing arts, language, history, migration and literature all contribute to the exploration of the central theme and open up for readers some of the many ways in which border crossings inform and revitalise our lives.

 

Author:
Tess LeSue (Amy T Matthews)

2016

 

Bound for Eden

A rollicking, funny historical romance of mistaken identity, wagon trains and an irresistible attraction.

Edited by:
Deirdre Kelly Lavrakas and Kim Peter Kovac, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

2016

 

The Kennedy Center New Visions New Voices 25 years /25 plays

The publication of GRAIL by Rosalba Clemente in this prestigious first ever Anthology by New Visions / New Voices at The Kennedy Center through American Dramatic Press, honours the 25th Anniversary of New Visions / New Voices at The Kennedy Center, Washington DC.

 "New Visions / New Voices … has been a vibrant, driving force in the creation of new plays for young people and families for 25 years … With the groundbreaking work of The Yellow Boat leading the way, the plays here deal with sophisticated themes—race, gender, social justice, class, ability—all in a youth-centered, nondogmatic way. This is the anthology that tells the story of a field that grew up while still embracing the whimsy and wonder of childhood. Long live New Visions/New Voices—here's to the next 25 years!"

Rives Collins
Area Head, Theatre for Young Audiences, Northwestern University
Past President, American Alliance for Theatre & Education

Edited by:
Jeri Kroll, Andrew Melrose and Jen Webb

2016

 

Old and New, Tried and Untried: Creativity and Research in the 21st Century: Creativity and Research in the 21st Century


Throughout the twentieth century, the world of higher education appeared to be stable and familiar. Universities delivered education and research under well-established discipline headings, and art schools delivered craft and field knowledge. Toward the end of that century, the relationship between the academy and the creative arts sector changed, and the role of teachers of creative practice and the expectations of tertiary creative arts courses changed with it. The past decades have been characterized by an ongoing debate about the respective value of teaching, creative practice, and research—particularly about the capacity of the arts to deliver research. This volume, from a distinguished list of academic writers and creators, offers contributions to these dialogues, as well as analyses of the international environment for the creative arts in the academy and the key government policies currently shaping the field.

 

 

   

Author:
Susan Sheridan

2016

   

The Fiction of Thea Astley

 
This book is in the Cambria Australian Literature Series headed by Susan Lever (University of Sydney).

Thea Astley (1925-2004) was one of the outstanding Australian fiction writers of the 20th century. Four of her novels, including her last, Drylands (1999), won the prestigious Miles Franklin prize, and she was awarded numerous literary and civic honors during her lifetime. The distinctive appeal of her work comes from its unique sense of place, in tropical Queensland and the South Pacific, and from the mordant irony of her gaze on Australian society and her fiercely compassionate portrayal of social outsiders. Place and people reflect one another as Astley deals in climatic extremes both geographical and emotional: living ‘on the edge of the cyclone’, her people face the threat of personal annihilation with the frail weapons of irony, satire or anarchic humor.
       

 

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