The Bachelor of Science (Specialisations) requires three years of full-time study (or the equivalent part-time).

The course is structured around coherent programs of study from First Year to Third Year, leading to a recognised Specialisation.

Admission to an honours program may be offered to a student who meets certain academic criteria and subject to the College being able to provide appropriate resources and staff to supervise the program of study.

The course is offered by the College of Science and Engineering.

Admission requirements

The minimum requirements for consideration for entry to all undergraduate courses are specified in detail in the University Entry Requirements.

Prerequisites and assumed knowledge for Specialisations:

There are no formal prerequisites for the specialisation in Biodiversity and Conservation but a knowledge of Mathematics, Physics or Chemistry to SACE Stage 1 is desirable.

Successful completion of SACE Stage 2 Chemistry or the equivalent is required for entry to the specialisation in Forensic and Analytical Science.

There are no formal prerequisites for the specialisations in Marine Biology, and Marine Biology and Aquaculture, but knowledge of Mathematics and/or Physics to SACE Stage 1 is desirable.

Successful completion of SACE Stage 2 Chemistry, Physics and Mathematical Methods or the equivalent are required for entry to the specialisation in Nanotechnology (Quantum Nanostructures stream), while successful completion of SACE Stage 2 Chemistry only will allow entry into the specialisation in Nanotechnology (Biomedical Nanotechnology stream).

Successful completion of SACE Stage 2 Physics and Mathematical Methods or the equivalent is assumed for the specialisations in Physics and Energy and Advanced Materials.

There are no formal prerequisites for the specialisation in Science Policy and Communication but a knowledge in any one Science area recognised by the SACE Board (particularly Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry or Biology) to SACE Stage 2, would be an advantage.

There are no prerequisites or assumed knowledge for the other specialisations.

Course aims

The course aims to provide students with a broad-based foundation in science together with the ability to acquire extensive subject knowledge in one or more science disciplines. It also aims to develop a range of transferable research, analytical and communication skills including the capacity to:

  • understand and apply relevant scientific principles
  • retrieve and present scientific information, including communicating effectively with a variety of audiences in written and spoken form
  • critically analyse and evaluate information and solve problems
  • analyse and evaluate data appreciate the multidisciplinary aspect of the science disciplines and engage positively with people and ideas beyond their own discipline area
  • use information technology work independently and take responsibility for updating and adapting their knowledge and skills
  • appreciate the role of science in society, the regulatory framework within which it operates and the ethical issues it raises; and
  • work effectively cooperatively and productively within a team.

The course provides the foundations that will underpin ongoing professional development, preparing graduates for further study in a science or non-science related discipline or for a career in a science related field or in other areas where the range of skills and knowledge acquired is needed or desirable.

Learning outcomes 

On completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • critically apply the theories, subject content, professional methodologies and research procedures in the science disciplines they have studied
  • understand and describe the processes through which current knowledge was developed
  • analyse and critically evaluate ideas/information/data and apply relevant scientific principles to solve problems by, for example, creating hypotheses, testing theories and predictions, designing and carrying out experiments using relevant techniques and protocols, and analysing reported data
  • communicate their findings to a variety of audiences in written and spoken form
  • appreciate that there are relationships and connections between different science disciplines and understand such relationships and connections in respect of the disciplines they have studied
  • work and learn independently and appreciate the need for continuing professional development
  • interact effectively as part of a team in order to achieve common goals
  • understand the role of science in society, operate within the relevant regulatory frameworks and value ethical behaviour in scholarship and professional activity.

Program of study

To qualify for the Bachelor of Science (Specialisations), a student must complete 108 units with a grade of P or NGP or better in each topic as per one specialisation program of study below.

Bachelor of Science (Animal Behaviour)
Bachelor of Science (Biodiversity and Conservation)
Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology)
Bachelor of Science (Chemical Sciences)
Bachelor of Science (Clean Technology) - No further student intake
Bachelor of Science (Coasts and Oceans)
Bachelor of Science (Energy and Advanced Materials)
Bachelor of Science (Environmental Science)
Bachelor of Science (Forensic and Analytical Science)
Bachelor of Science (Geography)
Bachelor of Science (Hydrology)
Bachelor of Science (Marine Biology)
Bachelor of Science (Marine Biology and Aquaculture)
Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biosciences)
Bachelor of Science (Nanotechnology)
Bachelor of Science (Physics)
Bachelor of Science (Science Policy and Communication)

The name of the specialisation will appear on the parchment.

Honours

Admission to an honours program may be offered to a student who meets certain academic criteria and subject to the College being able to provide appropriate resources and staff to supervise the program of study.

Refer to Bachelor of Science (Honours)