Position

Associate Professor
College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Biography

Born and raised in Melbourne, Ian completed his BA (hons) and MA in philosophy at the University of Melbourne before moving to the Australian National University to study for his PhD. His dissertation supervisors were Frank Jackson and Philip Pettit who greatly influenced his approach to philosophy in the early part of his career.

After working at the University of Auckland (1995), Flinders University (1996-1998) and King's College London (1998-2000), Ian returned to Flinders in 2000 where he is now Associate Professor of Philosophy. After working extensively on simulation theory, imagination, empathy and fiction, in recent years he has focused on the cognitive science of terrorism. The move to terrorism was motivated by a longstanding interest in violence and a desire to address significant contemporary problems from a cognitive science perspective. He has published in a range of journals and collections and has published three books with OUP. His textbook Philosophy of Mind: A Beginner's Guide is used in philosophy departments across the world and has been translated into three languages. His coauthors include Steve Stich, Greg Currie, Lina Eriksson and Haley Brokensha.

Qualifications

BA (hons), University of Melbourne, 1985
MA, University of Melbourne, 1987
PhD, Australian National University, 1995

Honours, awards and grants

Major Laurie Prize, University of Melboure 1985.

APRA 1992-1995.

Key responsibilities

Teaching and research, College of Humanties, Arts and Social Science.

Teaching interests

Philosophy of mind, cognitive science, civil disobedience and environmental philosophy

Topic Coordinator:

Topic Lecturer:

Research expertise

  • Cognitive science
  • Philosophy

Research interests

Terrorism

Cognitive science

Philosophy of mind

RHD research supervision

Completion

Principal supervisor : The self (1) ; History of Teleology (1) ; Pleasure and Pain (1) ; Theories of the Self (-1) ;

RHD Student Achievements

  • Matt Usher
    PhD - November 2014
  • Suzi Roux
    PhD - November 2014
  • Sandra Egege
    PhD - November 2014

Publications

  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2017). Empathy and knowing what it's like. In Heidi L. Maibom, ed. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Empathy. New York, United States of America: Routledge, pp. 148-157.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2012). Fiction, imagination, and ethics. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie, ed. Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. New York, USA: Taylor and Francis, pp. 71-89.
    [Scopus]
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2011). Problems, questions and concepts in the philosophy of mind. In James Garvey, ed. Companion to Philosophy of Mind. London, UK: Continuum, pp. 1-34.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2009). Introduction: Themes and Criticisms. In Ian Ravenscroft, ed. Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes from the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-19.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2009). Is folk psychology a theory? In John Symons & Paco Calvo, ed. The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Psychology. London and New York: Routledge, pp. 131-147.
    [Scopus]
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2005). Philosophy of mind: a beginner's guide. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
  • Currie, G.P. and Ravenscroft, I.M. (2002). Recreative minds: imagination in philosophy and psychology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (Ed.). (2009). Minds, Ethics and Conditionals: Themes from the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2010). How To Be A Philosopher: Ian Ravenscroft philosophizes about philosophizing. Philosophy Now, 81 (October/November) pp. 19-20.
    [Web Link] [Web Link]
  • Ravenscroft, I. (2012). Philosophy of Mind: A Beginner's Guide (Korean edition)
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2010). Folk Psychology as a Theory. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. California, US: The Metaphysics Research Lab, Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University.
    [Web Link]
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2008). Philosophie des Geistes: Eine Einfuhrung.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2004). Folk psychology as a theory. *The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Stanford, CA: Center for the Study of Language and Information, Stanford University.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2017). Empathy and knowing what it's like. In Heidi L. Maibom, ed. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Empathy. New York, United States of America: Routledge, pp. 148-157.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2012). Fiction, imagination, and ethics. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie, ed. Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. New York, USA: Taylor and Francis, pp. 71-89.
    [Scopus]
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2011). Problems, questions and concepts in the philosophy of mind. In James Garvey, ed. Companion to Philosophy of Mind. London, UK: Continuum, pp. 1-34.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2009). Is folk psychology a theory? In John Symons & Paco Calvo, ed. The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Psychology. London and New York: Routledge, pp. 131-147.
    [Scopus]
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2009). Introduction: Themes and Criticisms. In Ian Ravenscroft, ed. Minds, Ethics, and Conditionals: Themes from the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 1-19.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2005). Philosophy of mind: a beginner's guide. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
  • Currie, G.P. and Ravenscroft, I.M. (2002). Recreative minds: imagination in philosophy and psychology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (Ed.). (2009). Minds, Ethics and Conditionals: Themes from the Philosophy of Frank Jackson. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Ravenscroft, I.M. (2017). Engaging the World: Writing, Imagination, and Enactivism. PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE, 41(1) pp. 45-54.
    [10.1353/phl.2017.0003] [Scopus]
  • Eriksson, L.M., Ravenscroft, I.M. and Brokensha, H. (2016). Charity, signaling, and welfare. Politics, Philosophy and Economics, 15(1) pp. 3-19.
    [10.1177/1470594X15584144] [Scopus]

Professional and community engagement

Ian has appeared in SA Life discussing is work on happiness.

He regularly addresses community groups on a range of philosophical topics.

Expertise for media contact

Subject Titles

  • Cognitive science
  • Philosophy

Interests

  • imagination
  • terrorism

Contact

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Phone: +61 8 82013942
Email:
Location: Humanities Building (221)
Postal address: GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia
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