Position/s

Associate Professor
Sociology

Research Higher Degree Co-ordinator
School of Social and Policy Studies

Biography

A/Prof Nik Taylor has been researching human-animal relations for over 15 years. She is an award winning author who has published 4 books and over 50 journal articles and book chapters on the human-pet bond; treatment of animals and animal welfare; links between human aggression and animal cruelty; slaughterhouses; meat-eating, and, animal shelter work. She has written for diverse audiences including, The Guardian, The Drum, The Conversation as well as numerous blogs and websites. More information can be found at, https://animalsinsocietygroup.wordpress.com/

Qualifications

BA (Hons.) Social Science (Sociology), Manchester Metropolitan University

PhD Sociology, MMU 

Honours, awards and grants

1. Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award, 2014 for The Rise Of Critical Animal Studies, (eds.)    http://www.routledge.com/catalogs/routledge_choice_outstanding_academic_titles/4/17/

2. Emerald Literati Award for Excellence, 2013, for Ethnography in evolution: adapting to the animal "other" in organizations, Journal of  Organizational Ethnography, 1(1). http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/authors/literati/awards.htm?year=2013&journal=joe 

Teaching interests

The sociology of human-animal interactions; Green criminology; Violence; Sociology of media; Social theory; Research methods and ethics

Topic Coordinator:

  • SOCI2007  Sociology of Nature and the Environment
  • SOCI2015  Sociology of Deviance
  • SOCI2023  Animals, Nature and Society

Topic Lecturer:

Research expertise

  • Sociology

Research interests

Human-animal interaction and relationships;
Links between domestic violence, child abuse and violence to companion animals;
Deviance and animal abuse;
Sociology of human-animal interactions;
Social theory, animals and the environment.

Supervisory interests

  • Animal-human relations

RHD research supervision

Current

Principal supervisor : Human-Animal relations and disasters (1) ; International Medical Graduates (1) ; Animal shelters and animal disposability (1) ; Gender performance in music subcultures (1) ;

Completion

Principal supervisor : Youth camps and religion (1) ;

Publications

  • Taylor, N. and Hamilton, L. (2014). Investigating the Other: Considerations on Multi-Species Research. In Martin Hand & Sam Hillyard, ed. Big Data? Qualitative Approaches to Digital Research. Bingley, West Yorkshire UK: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, pp. 251-271.
    [10.1108/S1042-319220140000013016]
  • Drew, L. and Taylor, N. (2014). Engaged Activist Research: Challenging Apolitical Objectivity. In Anthony J Nocella, John Sorensen, Kim Socha, Atsuko Matsuoka, ed. Defining Critical Animal Studies: an Intersectional Social Justice Approach for Liberation. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, pp. 158-176.
  • Fitzgerald, A. and Taylor, N. (2014). The cultural hegemony of meat and the animal industrial complex. In Nik Taylor; Richard Twine, ed. The rise of critical animal studies: from the margin to the centre. London, United Kingdom: Routledge, pp. 165-182.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. and Hamilton, L. (2014). Care of the Underdog: Animals, Culture and the Creation of Moral Certainty in the Rescue Shelter. In Lindsay Hamilton, Laura Mitchell and Anita Mangan, ed. Contemporary Issues in Management. Cheltenham, Gloucester, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing, pp. 173-186.
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2013). Animal cruelty and delinquency, criminality and youth violence. In MP Brewster & CL Reyes, ed. Animal Cruelty: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Understanding. Durham, USA: Carolina Academic Press, pp. 217-230.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. (2012). Animals, method, mess: Post-humanism, Sociology and animal studies. In L Birke & J Hockenhull, ed. Crossing Boundaries. Boston, USA: Brill, pp. 37-50.
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Anthropomorphism and the Animal Subject. In Rob Boddice, ed. Anthropocentrism: Humans, Animals, Environments. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill, pp. 265-279.
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Can Sociology Contribute to the Emancipation of Animals? In Nik Taylor and Tania Signal, ed. Theorizing Animals: Re-thinking Humanimal Relations. Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill, pp. 201-220.
    [10.1163/ej.9789004202429.i-294.51]
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Thinking about animals. In Nik Taylor and Tania Signal, ed. Theorizing Animals: Re-thinking Humanimal Relations. Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill, pp. 1-17.
    [10.1163/ej.9789004202429.i-294.8]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2009). An overview of the research. In Linzey, A, ed. The Link between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Brighton, UK: Sussex Academic Press, pp. 297-301.
  • Taylor, N. and Kearney, J. (2006). The impact of sibling substance misuse on children and young people. In Fiona Harbin, Michael Murphy, ed. Secret lives: Growing with substance : working with children and young people affected by familial substance misuse. Lyme Regis, UK: Russell House Publishing, pp. 126-137.
  • Story, L., Taylor, N., McVeigh, E., Jenkinson, C. and Kennedy, S. (2005). Assessing health status in neurology. In D. Olive, ed. Endometriosis in Clinical Practice. London: Taylor and Francis, pp. 161-172.
  • Taylor, N. and Twine, R. (2014). Editor. London & New York: Routledge.
  • Taylor, N. and Twine, R. (2014). The rise of critical animal studies: from the margin to the centre. London: Routledge.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. (2013). Humans, Animals, and Society: An Introduction to Human-Animal Studies. New York, USA: Lantern Books.
    [Web Link]
  • Hamilton, L. and Taylor, N. (2013). Animals at Work: Identity, Politics and Culture in Work with Animals. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2011). Editors. Nik Taylor and Tania Signal, ed. Leiden and Boston: Brill.
  • Taylor, N. (2012). From gate to plate: perspectives on contemporary food production and animal welfare. The Arts and Sciences of Human - Animal Interaction. Cambridge UK. Jul 2012.
  • Taylor, N. (2012). Review of Pachirat, T., Every Twelve Seconds: Industrialized Slaughter and the Politics of Sight. Anthrozoos, 25(3) pp. 388-390.
    [10.2752/175303712X13403555186532]
  • Taylor, N. (2012). Reversing Meat-Eating Culture to Combat Climate Change, pp. 3-12.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N., Fraser, H., Signal, T. and Prentice, K. (2014). Social Work, Animal-Assisted Therapies and Ethical Considerations: A Programme Example from Central Queensland, British Journal of Social Work, pp. 1-18.
    [10.1093/bjsw/bcu115]
  • Daly, B., Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2014). Pups & Babes: Quantifying Sources of Difference in Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Accounts of Human and Animal Abuse. Anthrozoos, 27(2) pp. 205-217.
    [10.2752/175303714X13903827487485] [Scopus]
  • Kemp, K., Signal, T., Botros, H., Taylor, N. and Prentice, K. (2014). Equine Facilitated Therapy with Children and Adolescents Who Have Been Sexually Abused: A Program Evaluation Study. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 23(3) pp. 558-566.
    [10.1007/s10826-013-9718-1] [Scopus]
  • Kavanagh, P., Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2013). The Dark Triad and animal cruelty: Dark personalities, dark attitudes, and dark behaviours. Personality and Individual Differences, 55(6) pp. 666-670.
    [10.1016/j.paid.2013.05.019] [Scopus]
  • Signal, T., Ghea, V., Taylor, N. and Acutt, D. (2013). When do psychologists pay attention to children harming animals? Human-Animal Interaction Bulletin, 1(2) pp. 82-97.
  • Signal, T., Taylor, N., Botros, H., Prentice, K. and Lazarus, K. (2013). Whispering to horses: Childhood sexual abuse, depression and the efficacy of Equine Facilitated Therapy. Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 5(1) pp. 24-32.
    [Web Link]
  • Hamilton, L. and Taylor, N. (2012). Ethnography in evolution: adapting to the animal "other" in organizations. Journal of Organizational Ethnography, 1(1) pp. 43-51.
    [10.1108/20466741211220642]
  • Prentice, K., Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2012). What's the buzz?: Bumblebees - a therapeutic preschool for abused children. Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 4(1) pp. 11-21.
    [Web Link]
  • Rice, S., Washington, P., Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2012). An analysis of domestic violence presenting to FRCs at intake and assessment. Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal, 23(2) pp. 89-98.
    [Web Link]
  • Hazel, S., Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2011). Can Teaching Veterinary and Animal-Science Students about Animal Welfare Affect Their Attitude toward Animals and Human-Related Empathy? Journal of Veterinary Medical Education, 38(1) pp. 74-83.
    [10.3138/jvme.38.1.74] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Criminology and Human-Animal Violence Research: The Contribution and the Challenge. Critical Criminology, 19(3) pp. 251-263.
    [10.1007/s10612-010-9124-6] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. (2010). Animal shelter emotion management: a case of in situ hegemonic resistance? Sociology, 44(1) pp. 85-101.
    [10.1177/0038038509351629] [Scopus]
  • Arbour, R., Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2009). Teaching kindness : the promise of humane education. Society & Animals, 17(2) pp. 136-148.
    [10.1163/156853009X418073] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2009). "Lock 'em up and throw away the key?" Community opinions regarding current animal abuse penalties. Australian Animal Protection Law Journal, 3 pp. 33-52.
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2009). Pet, pest, profit: isolating differences in attitudes towards the treatment of animals. Anthrozoos, 22(2) pp. 129-135.
    [10.2752/175303709X434158] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2009). Willingness to pay : Australian consumers and 'on the farm' welfare. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, 12(4) pp. 345-359.
    [10.1080/10888700903163658] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2008). Throwing the baby out with the bathwater: towards a sociology of the human-animal abuse 'link' Sociological Research Online, 13(1-2)
    [Scopus] [Web Link]
  • Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2008). Propensity to report intimate partner violence in Australia: community demographics. Behavior and Social Issues, 17(1) pp. 8-19.
  • Taylor, N. (2007). 'Never an it': intersubjectivity and the creation of animal personhood in animal shelters. Qualitative Sociological Review, 3(1) pp. 59-73.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. (2007). Human-animal studies: a challenge to social boundaries? Proteus, 24(1) pp. 1-5.
    [Scopus]
  • Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2007). Attitude to animals and empathy: comparing animal protection and general community samples. Anthrozoos, 20(2) pp. 125-130.
    [10.2752/175303707X207918] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N., Signal, T. and Stark, T. (2006). Australia domestic violence, child abuse and companion animal harm: service provision. Journal of Home Economics Institute of Australia, 13(1) pp. 2-5.
  • Jones, G., Jenkinson, C., Taylor, N., Mills, A. and Kennedy, S. (2006). Measuring quality of life in women with endometriosis: Tests of data quality, score reliability, response rate and scaling assumptions of the Endometriosis Health Profile Questionnaire. Human Reproduction, 21(10) pp. 2686-2693.
    [10.1093/humrep/del231] [Scopus]
  • Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2006). Attitudes to animals in the animal protection community compared to a normative community sample. Society & Animals, 14(3) pp. 265-274.
    [10.1163/156853006778149181] [Scopus]
  • Signal, T. and Taylor, N. (2006). Attitudes to animals: demographics within a community sample. Society & Animals, 14(2) pp. 147-157.
    [10.1163/156853006776778743] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2006). Community demographics and the propensity to report animal cruelty. Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science, 9(3) pp. 201-210.
    [10.1207/s15327604jaws0903_2] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. (2005). Luddites or limits? Animal rights activists attitudes towards science. Journal of Critical Animal Studies, 3(1) pp. 1-16.
  • Taylor, N. and Kearney, J. (2005). Researching hard-to reach populations: privileged access interviewers and drug using parents. Sociological Research Online, 10(2)
    [Scopus] [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2005). Empathy and attitudes to animals. Anthrozoos, 18(1) pp. 18-27.
    [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. (2004). In it for the nonhuman animals: animal welfare, moral certainty, and disagreements. Society & Animals, 12(4) pp. 317-339.
    [10.1163/1568530043068047] [Scopus]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2004). Attitudes to animals: an indicator of interpersonal violence? Journal of Home Economics Institute of Australia, 11(3) pp. 9-12.
  • Taylor, N. (2013). Humans, Animals, and Society: An Introduction to Human-Animal Studies. New York, USA: Lantern Books.
    [Web Link]
  • Hamilton, L. and Taylor, N. (2013). Animals at Work: Identity, Politics and Culture in Work with Animals. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2013). Animal cruelty and delinquency, criminality and youth violence. In MP Brewster & CL Reyes, ed. Animal Cruelty: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Understanding. Durham, USA: Carolina Academic Press, pp. 217-230.
    [Web Link]
  • Taylor, N. (2012). Animals, method, mess: Post-humanism, Sociology and animal studies. In L Birke & J Hockenhull, ed. Crossing Boundaries. Boston, USA: Brill, pp. 37-50.
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Anthropomorphism and the Animal Subject. In Rob Boddice, ed. Anthropocentrism: Humans, Animals, Environments. Leiden, The Netherlands: Brill, pp. 265-279.
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Can Sociology Contribute to the Emancipation of Animals? In Nik Taylor and Tania Signal, ed. Theorizing Animals: Re-thinking Humanimal Relations. Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill, pp. 201-220.
    [10.1163/ej.9789004202429.i-294.51]
  • Taylor, N. (2011). Thinking about animals. In Nik Taylor and Tania Signal, ed. Theorizing Animals: Re-thinking Humanimal Relations. Leiden, the Netherlands: Brill, pp. 1-17.
    [10.1163/ej.9789004202429.i-294.8]
  • Taylor, N. and Signal, T. (2009). An overview of the research. In Linzey, A, ed. The Link between Animal Abuse and Human Violence. Brighton, UK: Sussex Academic Press, pp. 297-301.
  • Kemp, K., Signal, T., Botros, H., Taylor, N. and Prentice, K. (2014). Equine Facilitated Therapy with Children and Adolescents Who Have Been Sexually Abused: A Program Evaluation Study. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 23(3) pp. 558-566.
    [10.1007/s10826-013-9718-1] [Scopus]
  • Hamilton, L. and Taylor, N. (2012). Ethnography in evolution: adapting to the animal "other" in organizations. Journal of Organizational Ethnography, 1(1) pp. 43-51.
    [10.1108/20466741211220642]

Professional and community engagement

Detailed information including media commentay, articles and news can be found here - 'In the News.'

Expertise for media contact

Interests

  • crime and animal abuse
  • human-animal violence links
  • animal welfare
  • green criminology

Contact

Add to address book
Phone: +61 8 82012491
Email:
Location: Social Sciences North (311)
Postal address: GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia

Further information

Managing Editor (Social Sciences), Society & Animals
Editorial Board Member, Anthrozoos; Journal for Critical Animal Studies

Associate, New Zealand Centre for Human-Animal Studies
Executive Committee Member, Minding Animals Australia
Charter Scholar, Animals & Society Institute, www.animalsandsociety.org/scholar/n_taylor
Co-convenor Animals in Society Working Group @ Flinders
Personal website

MACO login

inspiring achievement