Bookcover - Process Physics

(Professor Reg Cahill)  

Process Physics: From Information Theory to Quantum Space and Matter

Published: Nova Science Publishers, 2005.
This book is about the new and very radical information-theoretic approach to comprehending and modelling reality.
It is called Process Physics because it uses a process model of time rather than, as in current physics, a non-process geometrical model of time, a model so successfully developed and used by Galileo, Newton, Einstein and others that for many physicists the phenomenon of time is actually identified with this geometrical model. Now, for the first time in the history of physics, we have a model of time that includes the distinctions between past, present and future. These distinctions cannot be made in the geometrical model of time. For this reason we can call the current prevailing physics Non-Process Physics.
In Process Physics we turn to a fundamental reformulation of the key concepts in physics. This entails that we must identify both the successes and failures of the Non-Process Physics, for it almost succeeded.

 

Book cover - Bootstrapping reality..... Bootstrapping Reality from the Limitations of Logic

Published: VDM Verlag, 2010
Author Chris Klinger describes the development and evolution of a new paradigm called 'Process Physics', a radical information-theoretic modelling of reality that utilises the limitations of logic first identified by Godel.
First describing the historical, philosophical, and metaphysical foundations of physics to consider how the prevailing views in modern physics arose and what this revealed and contributed to the development of Process Physics, the author goes on to describe the fundamentals of the new theory and demonstrates the viability of looking outside the current paradigms to reveal that Godel's theorems provide the opportunity to re-evaluate the status of conventional modern physics.
The vital insight is that the limitations of logic imposed by Godel (and those who followed) furnish the key to achieving a profound, if not ultimate, understanding of Nature at its most fundamental level.