Position

Associate Professor
College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Biography

Jane Haggis is an historian who combines historical analysis with social and cultural theory. Her research interests are wide, but cluster around three themes: cross-cultural encounters, affect and power in imperial and post-imperial contexts. She has published widely internationally in feminist historiography and gender and empire, and is currently leading an Australian Research Council funded project [DP 170104310 2017-2019), ‘Beyond Empire transnational religious networks & liberal cosmopolitanisms’ with Professor Margaret Allen, Professor Fiona Paisley and Professor Clare Midgley. With these scholars she recently published, Cosmopolitan Lives on the Cusp of Empire: Interfaith, Cross-Cultural and Transnational Networks, 1860-1950, Palgrave Pivot, 2017. Her long engagement with critical race studies most recently saw the publication of “Situated Knowledge or Ego (His)toire?: Memory, History and the She-Migrant in an Imaginary of ‘Terra Nullius’” Ngapartji, Ngapartji. In turn, in turn: Ego-Histoire, Europe and Indigenous Australians (ANU Lives Series in Biography, 2014). It also led to an Australian Research Council funded project (with S Schech) From Stranger to Citizen: Migration, Modernisation and Racialisation in the Making of the New Australian” (DP 0665782) results from which she most recently published in “White Australia and Otherness: The Limits to Hospitality” in Cultures in Refuge: Seeking Sanctuary in Modern Australia (2012). She is currently working on a monograph from that project, provisionally titled: Storying the borderlands: imaginaries of modernity and the refugee in Australia. The book (with S Schech) Culture and Development, (2000), pioneered a postcolonial feminist analysis of International Development and remains a seminal text.

Qualifications

B.A. (Adel), B.A. (Hons) (Adel), M.(Econ) (Manc) Ph.D. (Manc)

Teaching interests

I really love working with students in engaging and challenging but fun learning environments. I'm a great advocate for C21st. pedagogies that create flows between face to face and eLearning and offer personalised learning journeys for students. I am currently leading a team developing a transdisciplinary student/academic partnership laboratory where we work on wicked problems and real world projects using design thinking to develop real world solutions. My topics often surprise students initially, because they are based on a student centred, active learning partnership model of teaching but, once 'acclimatised' I get pretty good feedback from students about the 'deep learning' and life-long learning skills they have developed or deepened during the topic. The areas I enjoy teaching in are colonial studies, critical gender and race studies, global inequality and asylum seekers. A new passion of mine is how to understand, challenge and build a digital future that works for all species and the planet we live in. I am currently making opportunities to develop this curriculum. The big question that drives my teaching (and my research) is how can we all live together in difference in the C21st? Watch this space as I develop my teaching topics to reflect this interest!

Topic Coordinator:

Topic Lecturer:

Research expertise

  • Cultural studies
  • Curriculum and pedagogy
  • Gender Studies
  • Historical studies

Research interests

Colonial Studies (Imperial emotion, internationalisms, humanitarianisms, gender, faith); Cosmopolitanisms: theory and practice, past and present; critical race studies, feminist historiography; feminist theory and methodology; postcolonial theory; decolonising curriiculums; post-human futures; digital pedagogies; migration and refugee studies;

Supervisory interests

  • Critical race studies
  • Digital histories
  • Emotions
  • Feminist theory and methodology
  • Gender and colonialism
  • History, British Empire
  • Life writing/life narrative
  • Post-colonial writing and theory

RHD research supervision

Completion

Principal supervisor : 1608 (5) ; 1699 (4) ;

Associate supervisor : 1899 (1) ;

Publications

  • Haggis, J. (2014). Situated Knowledge or Ego (His)toire?: Memory, History and the She-Migrant in an Imaginary of 'Terra Nullius' In Vanessa Castejon, Anna Cole, Oliver Haag and Karen Hughes, ed. Ngapartji Ngapartji In turn, in turn: Ego-histoire, Europe and Indigenous Australia. Canberra, Australia: ANU Press, pp. 159-172.
    [Web Link]
  • Haggis, J. (2012). White Australia and Otherness: The Limits to Hospitality. In A Hayes & R Mason, ed. Cultures in Refuge. Seeking Sanctuary in Modern Australia. Farnham, UK: Ashgate Publishing, pp. 15-30.
    [Scopus] [Web Link]
  • Haggis, J. and Schech, S.B. (2009). Migrants, masculinities and work in the Australian national imaginary. In Donaldson, M., Higgins, R., Howson R. and Pease, B., ed. Migrant men: Critical studies of masculinities and the migration experience. New York, US: Routledge, pp. 60-76.
    [Scopus]
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2008). Culture and Development. In Vandana Desai and Robert Potter, ed. The Companion to Development Studies. 2nd ed. London, UK: Hodder, pp. 50-54.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2004). Terrains of migrancy and whiteness: how British migrants locate themselves in Australia. In Aileen Moreton-Robinson, ed. Whitening Race : Essays in social and cultural criticism. Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS Aboriginal Studies Press, pp. 176-191.
  • Haggis, J. (2004). Thoughts on a politics of whiteness in a (never quite post) colonial country: abolitionism, essentialism and incommensurability. In Aileen Moreton-Robinson, ed. Whitening Race : Essays in social and cultural criticism. Canberra, ACT: AIATSIS Aboriginal Studies Press, pp. 48-58.
  • Haggis, J. (2003). White women and colonialism: towards a non-recuperative history. In Reina Lewis and Sara Mills, ed. Feminist Postcolonial Theory. New York, NY: Taylor and Francis, pp. 161-189.
  • Haggis, J. and Schech, S.B. (2002). Introduction: pathways to culture and development. In Development: a Cultural Studies Reader. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing, pp. xiii-xxiii.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2000). Migrancy, whiteness and the settler self in contemporary Australia. In John Docker and Gerhard Fischer, ed. Race, colour and identity in Australia and New Zealand. Sydney: University of New South Wales Press, pp. 231-239.
    [Web Link]
  • Haggis, J. and Schech, S.B. (1999). Incoherence and whiteness: reflections on a study of settler life histories. In Belinda McKay, ed. Unmasking whiteness: race relations and reconciliation. Nathan: Queensland Studies Centre, Griffiths University, pp. 45-51.
  • Haggis, J., Midgley, C., Allen, M. and Paisley, F. (2017). Cosmopolitan Lives on the Cusp of Empire: Interfaith, Cross-cultural and Transnational Networks, 1860 to 1950. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2003). Culture and development a critical introduction. Taipei: Chu Liu Book Company.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2002). Development: A Cultural Studies Reader. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2000). Culture and Development: A critical Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
  • Cardell, K. and Haggis, J. (Eds.). (2011). Co-editor. Special Issue: To the Letter ed. Taylor and Francis.
  • Haggis, J., Schech, S.B., Baulderstone, J.M. and Ellickson, C.M. (2005). Occasional Paper: Gender Equity in DECS - A Focus on Women, pp. 1-44.
    [Web Link]
  • Koerner, C. and Haggis, J. (2011). In Relationship with Indigenous Sovereignty. In Damien W. Riggs and Clemence Due, ed. Directions and Intersections. Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Association. Proceedings of the 2011 Australian Critical Race and Whiteness Studies Association and Indigenous Studies Research Network Joint Conference. Surfers Paradise, Queensland. Dec 2011, pp. 122-132.
  • Rankin, L.A., Haggis, J., Luzeckyj, A.M. and Gare, C. (2016). Messy Design: Organic Planning for Blended Learning. Journal of Learning Design, 9(2) pp. 14-30.
    [10.5204/jld.v9i2.267]
  • Haggis, J. and Mulholland, M. (2013). Rethinking difference and sex education: from cultural inclusivity to normative diversity. Sex Education: Sexuality Society and Learning, 14(1) pp. 57-66.
    [10.1080/14681811.2013.824873] [Scopus]
  • Allen, M. and Haggis, J. (2013). True Friends or False? The changing nature of relationships between Indian and British missionary women in the imperial contact zone of India, c1880-1940. Outskirts, 28
    [Web Link]
  • Haggis, J. (2012). What an 'Archive Rat' reveals to us about storying theory and the nature of history. Australian Feminist Studies, 27(73) pp. 289-295.
    [10.1080/08164649.2012.706522] [Scopus]
  • Haggis, J. and Holmes, M.E. (2011). Epistles to Emails: Letters, relationship building and the virtual age. Life Writing, 8(2) pp. 169-185.
    [10.1080/14484528.2011.559733] [Scopus]
  • Haggis, J. and Schech, S.B. (2010). Refugees, settlement processes and citizenship making: an Australian case study. National Identities, 12(4) pp. 365-379.
    [10.1080/14608944.2010.520972] [Scopus]
  • Haggis, J. and Allen, M. (2008). Imperial emotions: affective communities of mission in British Protestant women's missionary publications c1880-1920. Journal of Social History, 41(3) pp. 691-716.
    [Scopus]
  • Haggis, J., Schech, S.B. and Rainbird, S.J. (2007). From refugee to settlement case worker: cultural brokers in the contact zone and the border work of identity. International Journal of Diversity in Organisations, Communities and Nations, 7(1) pp. 237-248.
  • Haggis, J. (2004). Beyond race and whiteness? Reflections on the new abolitionists and an Australian critical whiteness studies. Borderlands E-Journal, 3(2)
    [Web Link]
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2001). Migrancy, Multiculturalism and Whiteness, Re-charting Core Identitites in Australia. Communal Plural: Journal of Trans-National and Cross-Cultural Studies, 9(2) pp. 143-159.
  • Haggis, J. (2001). The Social Memory of a Colonial Frontier. Australian Feminist Studies, 16(34) pp. 92-99.
    [Scopus]
  • Haggis, J. and Schech, S.B. (2000). Meaning well and global good manners: reflections on white western feminist cross-cultural praxis. Australian Feminist Studies, 15(33) pp. 387-399.
    [10.1080/713611987]
  • Haggis, J., Schech, S.B. and Fitzgerald, G. (1999). Narrating lives, narrating whiteness - a research note. Journal of Australian Studies, 23(60) pp. 168-173.
    [10.1080/14443059909387464]
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (1998). Postcolonialism, identity and location: being white Australian in Asia. Environment and Planning D-Society and Space, 16 pp. 615-629.
    [10.1068/d160615]
  • Haggis, J. (2014). Situated Knowledge or Ego (His)toire?: Memory, History and the She-Migrant in an Imaginary of 'Terra Nullius' In Vanessa Castejon, Anna Cole, Oliver Haag and Karen Hughes, ed. Ngapartji Ngapartji In turn, in turn: Ego-histoire, Europe and Indigenous Australia. Canberra, Australia: ANU Press, pp. 159-172.
    [Web Link]
  • Haggis, J. (2012). White Australia and Otherness: The Limits to Hospitality. In A Hayes & R Mason, ed. Cultures in Refuge. Seeking Sanctuary in Modern Australia. Farnham, UK: Ashgate Publishing, pp. 15-30.
    [Scopus] [Web Link]
  • Haggis, J. and Schech, S.B. (2009). Migrants, masculinities and work in the Australian national imaginary. In Donaldson, M., Higgins, R., Howson R. and Pease, B., ed. Migrant men: Critical studies of masculinities and the migration experience. New York, US: Routledge, pp. 60-76.
    [Scopus]
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2003). Culture and development a critical introduction. Taipei: Chu Liu Book Company.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2002). Development: A Cultural Studies Reader. Oxford, UK: Blackwell Publishing.
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2000). Culture and Development: A critical Introduction. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing.
  • Cardell, K. and Haggis, J. (Eds.). (2011). Co-editor. Special Issue: To the Letter ed. Taylor and Francis.
  • Haggis, J. and Allen, M. (2008). Imperial emotions: affective communities of mission in British Protestant women's missionary publications c1880-1920. Journal of Social History, 41(3) pp. 691-716.
    [Scopus]
  • Haggis, J. (2004). Beyond race and whiteness? Reflections on the new abolitionists and an Australian critical whiteness studies. Borderlands E-Journal, 3(2)
    [Web Link]
  • Schech, S.B. and Haggis, J. (2001). Migrancy, Multiculturalism and Whiteness, Re-charting Core Identitites in Australia. Communal Plural: Journal of Trans-National and Cross-Cultural Studies, 9(2) pp. 143-159.

Expertise for media contact

Subject Titles

  • Discrimination
  • Ethnic affairs/Mutliculturalism
  • Feminism
  • Gender studies
  • Race relations
  • Refugees

Interests

  • asylum seekers
  • racism

Contact

Add to address book
Phone: +61 8 82012623
Email:
Location: Social Sciences South (306)
Postal address: GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia
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