Locations

The Northern Territory Medical Program is based in Darwin and the NT Remote Clinical School operates in several locations across the Northern Territory. The locations can be viewed by downloading NTCS-RCS Flyover and opening in Google Earth.

Darwin

Darwin's multicultural population of 100,000 people is made up of people from over 50 nationalities. The traditional Aboriginal landowners of the Darwin area are the Larrakia people.

Darwin enjoys warm weather all year round, with an average temperature of 32 degrees Celsius. The cooler dry season begins in May when swarms of dragonflies fill the air. The sky is clear blue & the sea is brilliant -and the stingers are gone (in theory anyway). The Build up is the transition between the Dry and the Wet and runs from late September to late November or December. During this period the Top End swelters with very high humidity and temperatures, which are challenging even for those of us who live here permanently. The Wet season runs from December through to March-April. Tremendous thunderstorms crash overhead, lightning jags across the sky, and the heavens open in a deafening torrent of rain. Don’t worry though, most buildings are airconditioned, including the student accommodation and the hospital.

Darwin has a fabulous array of multicultural markets. Most of the world's culinary styles are represented at the Mindil Beach markets which are held on Thursday and Sunday nights during the Dry Season. Other markets that operate year round include Parap on Saturday mornings and Nightcliff and Rapid Creek on Sunday mornings.

The City centre is the place to party - pubs abound in Mitchell St - a favourite for the weekend party crowd. Enjoy one of the outdoor concerts held during the Dry Season or a movie at the outdoor Deckchair Cinema. Darwin is famous far and wide for its spectacular sunsets. Take a friend and a drink to one of the vantage points along the water to enjoy one of life's simple pleasures.

A network of bicycle paths and walking tracks follow the city's coastline through mangroves, monsoon forests and beaches. Other popular sporting activities include dragon boat racing, beach volley ball, sailing, tennis, bushwalking, fishing, cricket and AFL. Kakadu, Litchfield and Nitmiluk (Katherine Gorge) National Parks are all within 3 hours drive of Darwin. Trips to these parks offer fantastic opportunities for Aboriginal cultural tours, bird watching, swimming, canoeing, sightseeing and bushwalking.

Although Darwin lacks the big department stores of the mainstream capital cities, you can buy almost anything here. Darwin City and Casuarina (close to the hospital) are the centres of the shopping action.

Links:
www.darwin.nt.gov.auwww.travelnt.com

Gunlom, Kakadu National Park
Gunlom, Kakadu National Park

Katherine

Katherine is located on the Katherine River, 300km to the south of Darwin. With a population of 8000 it is the third largest town in the Northern Territory. Nitmiluk (Katherine Gorge) National Park is a short 30 minute drive away and offers activities like fishing, canoeing, bushwalking, birdwatching, camping and four-wheel driving. Southern Kakadu, the Roper and Victoria River regions are easily accessible from Katherine. Katherine itself offers a wide range of services to outlying communities. It has a modern air-conditioned shopping centre, hospital, golf course, sportsgrounds and swimming pool. There are a large number of Commonwealth and Territory Government services. 29% of the Katherine Region’s population identify as Indigenous.

Links:
www.katherine.nt.gov.au
www.travelnt.com
www.krol.com.au

Alice Springs

Alice Springs is surrounded by the MacDonnell Ranges and lies in the heart of Australia - at least 1500 kms from the sea in any direction. It is a thriving community of around 28,000 people. The Arrernte people are the traditional owners of the area. The desert weather is very hot and dry in the summer, though it gets cool from May to September and overnight temperatures can drop to minus seven degrees.

Alice Springs is an interesting place to visit or live - you can experience art, sport and performances and learn about the local Aboriginal culture. You can learn a bit of Alice Springs' colonial heritage at the Flying Doctor Museum or the Telegraph Station. There are modern shopping centres and great traditional and contemporary art to view or buy. There are many options to explore the outback from here & to visit world famous National Parks like Uluru & Kata Tjuta. To get a better understanding of the flora and fauna of the region spend a day at the Alice Springs Desert Park.

Nhulunbuy

Cape Arnhem, Arnhem Land
Cape Arnhem, Arnhem Land
Nhulunbuy (population 4000) is a remote multicultural community on the north-eastern tip of Arnhem Land, surrounded by pristine tropical waters. For around six months of the year it is not accessible by road. Nhulunbuy is the service centre for the Rio Tinto Gove bauxite mine and the surrounding Indigenous population. The small Aboriginal communities of Yirrkala and Gunyanara are both within 20 minutes drive of Nhulunbuy. The local Aboriginal people of East Arnhemland call themselves Yolngu, and their traditional culture and language are still very strong although their lives are also greatly influenced by western knowledge and technologies.

Away from the mining areas are beautiful white beaches surrounded by crystal clear water, and rivers encroached by stringybark and monsoonal forests. A permit from the local land management office, Dhimurru, gives you access to many fantastic camping and fishing locations. To learn more about the people and the landscape, you can join a local Yolngu cultural tour, visit art and craft centres or follow an interpretative walking trail.

Links:
www.dhimurru.com.au
www.travelnt.com
www.ealta.org

Darwin Harbour
Darwin Harbour
inspiring achievement