The Southgate Institute’s research activity focuses on what can be done about the underlying factors that determine the distribution of health and well-being outcomes. We are a leading partner in the Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity.

Our activity areas cover social exclusion; the structure of suburban environments; economic, social and structural determinants of risky and unhealthy behaviours; and social, cultural and economic barriers to health and other related service use; and studies of social determinants and equity in health policy. Our research is intended to help inform initiatives and policy at local, regional, state and national levels to promote population health and reduce health inequities and their underlying causes.

Our current flagship projects are:


Primary Health Care and Community Services

Primary Health Care & Community Services aims to investigate the quality of primary health care, health promotion and population health initiatives and has a focus on equity in health access and outcomes, social determinants of health, primary prevention, and health services and policy. Led by Dr Toby Freeman, this area of research is based on a participatory approach engaging policymakers, practitioners and primary health care clients within primary and community health services. 

Major projects:

For more information on our Primary Health Care and Community Services research, please click here

 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health

The Southgate Institute strives to conduct respectful, participatory research in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services, programs and communities. We also ensure the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples is consistently prioritised in any social determinants and health service research we conduct. The research group is co-led by Dr Tamara Mackean and Dr Toby Freeman and regularly partners with the Poche Centre for Indigenous Health and Well-being.

Major projects:

For more information on our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health research, please click here

 

Health Equity and Policy

Health Equity and Policy focuses on the scope and potential for public policies and programs to promote population health and health equity. Governments increasingly accept health promotion and reduction of disease through action on the determinants of health as a central and urgent goal of public policy. Led by Professor Fran Baum, this area of research is based on a collaborative research approach aiming to produce policy relevant research. 

The aim of the Centre for Research Excellence in the Social Determinants of Health Equity is to advance understanding of how government policy can work more effectively to address the social determinants of health, so as to improve health and promote the fair distribution of health in society.

Our research focuses on a wide range of policy sectors that affect the social determinants of health including social security, health systems,trade, urban land-use, digital technologies and Indigenous health.

Major projects:

We have established a new collaboration - the Punching Above Weight Network to examine issues of global population health.  Please click here for more information.

For more information on our Health Equity and Policy research, please click here

  

Migrant and Refugee Health and Wellbeing

At the Southgate Institute a multidisciplinary programme of research, led by A/Prof Anna Ziersch, has been examining the social determinants of health and wellbeing for people from migrant and refugee backgrounds.  The aim of this research is to provide an evidence base for policy makers and service providers, and to contribute to innovative responses to improve health and well-being amongst people from migrant and refugee backgrounds.  The work is highly collaborative with most projects involving staff from other universities and/or service providers, and undertaken in partnership with communities.

For more information on our migrant and refugee health and wellbeing research, please click here.

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