Dr Stephen Gregory

Lecturer in Molecular Medical Science

College of Medicine and Public Health

Research expertise

My research focusses on how cells divide and the consequences when this goes wrong, for example in cancer. We find that cells that gain or lose chromosomes have metabolic changes, so we are looking for metabolic therapies that can target this common feature of cancer cells.

Research expertise

My research focusses on how cells divide and the consequences when this goes wrong, for example in cancer. We find that cells that gain or lose chromosomes have metabolic changes, so we are looking for metabolic therapies that can target this common feature of cancer cells.

place Flinders Medical Centre
GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia

In his PhD, Stephen characterized a novel family of transcription factors that are important in animal development. He subsequently worked in Cambridge, UK, for five years, identifying signalling and physical links through integrins that allow cell adhesion and muscle attachment. He returned to Adelaide to work with Prof Saint on the mechanics of cell division. This led to him starting his own work on chromosomal instability and cancer in 2009. After running this lab at Adelaide University for 9 years, he moved to Flinders in 2018.

Qualifications

BSc (Hons) University of Adelaide

PhD (Biochemistry), University of Adelaide

Grad. Dip. Education, Queensland Inst. of Technology

Grad. Cert. Online Learning, University of Adelaide

Research expertise
Biochemistry and cell biology
Genetics
Molecular biology
Research interests

My work focuses on using model organisms to study cell division. I have been funded by the NHMRC since 2009 to explore ways to kill cancer cells by targeting their unstable mode of cell division called chromosomal instability.

Cancers are cells that not only divide too much, but also usually divide unstably, gaining and losing chromosomes. This chromosomal instablility is not seen in normal dividing cells, so it may be an ideal chemotherapy target - something that we can affect in the cancer without hurting normal cells.

Using the advantages of Drosophila genetics, we have screened for gene knockouts that can kill unstably dividing cells, but not normal ones. We have found several ways to specifically kill cells with chromosomal instability, including targeting the JNK pathway, centrosomes or cell metabolism. We are now working to explain why unstably dividing cells are sensitive to these processes, and how we can best target them.

Topic coordinator
MMED3935 Human Molecular Genetics
Topic lecturer
MMED9150 Medicine 1A
MMED3938 Advanced Human Molecular Genetics
MMED2934 Introduction to Human Molecular Genetics
Higher degree by research supervision
Current
Principal supervisor: Cancer metabolism (1)
Completion
Principal supervisor: Cancer metabolism (4), Cytokinesis (1)
Associate supervisor: JNK signalling (1)
Publications
Expert for media contact
Biochemistry
Cells
Genetics/Genetic engineering
Available for contact via
Or contact the media team
+61 8 82012092
0427 398 713
Media expertise
  • Biochemistry
  • Cells
  • Genetics/Genetic engineering

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