Dr Dong Gui Hu

Research Fellow

College of Medicine and Public Health

Research expertise

Dr Dong Gui HU was awarded a PhD degree in molecular genetics from the University of Adelaide in 2004. Dr Hu held a postdoctoral position (2006-2018) in the field of molecular pharmacology in the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Flinders University, and is currently an academic Research Fellow in the department.

Research expertise

Dr Dong Gui HU was awarded a PhD degree in molecular genetics from the University of Adelaide in 2004. Dr Hu held a postdoctoral position (2006-2018) in the field of molecular pharmacology in the Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Flinders University, and is currently an academic Research Fellow in the department.

place Flinders Medical Centre (6D:314)
GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001, South Australia
Qualifications

PhD

Research expertise
Molecular biology
Pharmacology and pharmaceutical sciences
Research interests

To define the molecular mechanisms that control the expression of UGT genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels

The regulation of UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGTs) genes at the transcriptional level via transcription factors binding to their promoters or at post-transcriptional level via miRNA binding to their 3' UTRs in response to endogenous (such as steriod hormones) and exogenous (such as anticancer drugs) stimuli defines the capacity of UGT enzymes to metabolize drugs and hence therapeutic effecacy. Results from these studies will improve our understanding of drug resistance and help identify novel approaches for clinical therapeutic management.

To define the molecular mechanisms that control the non-classical splicing of UGT genes

UGT genes generate a large number of non-classical spliced transcripts in addition to their functional wildtype transcripts. The molecular mechanisms that control the balance of the wildtype and non-classical spliced transcripts define the capacity of UGT activities. Deregulation of this balance occurs in cancers and thus to define the underlying mechanisms may have clinical implications. However, little is known about the mechanisms how non-classical spliced transcripts are generated and how they are deregulated in cancers. In addition, non-classical spliced transcripts may serve as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for human diseases such as cancers.

ADME genes and drug resistance and cancer risk

Utimately, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs is coordinately regulated by ADME genes, genes that are involved in drug Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion. ADME genes are also involved in detoxification and clearance of endogenous and exogenous carcinogens. Hence, the deregulation of ADME genes may relate to drug resistance and cancer development and progression.

Teaching interests
As a supervisor for Honours and PhD students in molecular pharmacology
Supervisory interests
Drug metabolising enzymes, cytochrome P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase
Molecular biology
Higher degree by research supervision
Current
Associate supervisor: molecular Pharmacology (3)
Publications

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